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Knowledge, attitudes and practice of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: the Bangladesh Population based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES).

Islam FM, Chakrabarti R, Dirani M, Islam MT, Ormsby G, Wahab M, Critchley C, Finger RP - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Age, gender, level of education and socio-economic status (SES) were significantly associated with KAP.Males (β = 0.393, 95% CI = 0.142-0.643), and any level of education compared to no schooling (β = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.596, 0.857) reported significantly more knowledge, after multivariate adjustments for covariates.Participants aged under 35 years, (odds ratio (OR)= 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.43) had significantly higher positive attitudes towards treatments of diabetes compared to those aged ≥65 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia; Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT

Background: To assess the Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) amongst the general community regarding type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in rural Bangladesh.

Methods: Data was collected using cluster random sampling from 3104 adults residing in a rural district in Bangladesh. Participants underwent a KAP questionnaire survey regarding assessing diabetes, socio-demographic and medical history. Descriptive, Chi-square and regression analyses were performed.

Results: Participants were aged between 30 and 89 years (M = 51, SD= 11.8) and 65.5% were female. The prevalence of diabetes was found to be 8.3%. The majority (93%) reported to have heard of diabetes, yet only 4% knew what a glucose tolerance test was. Only 50% reported that they knew physical inactivity was a risk factor. Age, gender, level of education and socio-economic status (SES) were significantly associated with KAP. A lower proportion (41%) of older participants (aged ≥65 years) reported that they knew that dietary modifications assist in diabetes control compared to those aged less than 35 years (69%), p<0.001. Males (β = 0.393, 95% CI = 0.142-0.643), and any level of education compared to no schooling (β = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.596, 0.857) reported significantly more knowledge, after multivariate adjustments for covariates. Participants aged under 35 years, (odds ratio (OR)= 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.43) had significantly higher positive attitudes towards treatments of diabetes compared to those aged ≥65 years. Of the 99 people with known diabetes, more than 50% (n = 52) never had their blood sugar levels checked since diagnosis.

Conclusions: Knowledge of diabetes and its risk factors is very limited in rural Bangladesh, even in persons diagnosed with type 2 DM. The development of public health programmes to increase knowledge of diabetes and its complications is required to assist people living in rural Bangladesh to control and management of diabetes.

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General Knowledge of Diabetes, its risk factors and management (N = 3104).
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pone-0110368-g001: General Knowledge of Diabetes, its risk factors and management (N = 3104).

Mentions: There was wide variation in the knowledge items, 4% to 93% (Figure 1). Overall, males had significantly better knowledge compared to females. That is, males were more likely than females to know that diabetes caused eye disease (18% vs. 13%), and diabetes could be controlled by regular exercise (55% vs. 48%). People in older age groups showed significantly poorer knowledge in relation to six of the items, compared to the people in younger age groups. For example, a significantly lower proportion (39%) of older participants (65 years or older) reported that they knew that regular physical activity can prevent diabetes compared to those aged less than 35 years (60%), p<0.001. Both people with at least SSC level of education and/or people with higher SES showed better knowledge on all of the items, for example, a significantly higher proportion (38%) of people with at least SSC level of education reported that they knew diabetes caused eye diseases compared to those with no schooling (9%) p<0.001 (Table 2).


Knowledge, attitudes and practice of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: the Bangladesh Population based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES).

Islam FM, Chakrabarti R, Dirani M, Islam MT, Ormsby G, Wahab M, Critchley C, Finger RP - PLoS ONE (2014)

General Knowledge of Diabetes, its risk factors and management (N = 3104).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196995&req=5

pone-0110368-g001: General Knowledge of Diabetes, its risk factors and management (N = 3104).
Mentions: There was wide variation in the knowledge items, 4% to 93% (Figure 1). Overall, males had significantly better knowledge compared to females. That is, males were more likely than females to know that diabetes caused eye disease (18% vs. 13%), and diabetes could be controlled by regular exercise (55% vs. 48%). People in older age groups showed significantly poorer knowledge in relation to six of the items, compared to the people in younger age groups. For example, a significantly lower proportion (39%) of older participants (65 years or older) reported that they knew that regular physical activity can prevent diabetes compared to those aged less than 35 years (60%), p<0.001. Both people with at least SSC level of education and/or people with higher SES showed better knowledge on all of the items, for example, a significantly higher proportion (38%) of people with at least SSC level of education reported that they knew diabetes caused eye diseases compared to those with no schooling (9%) p<0.001 (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Age, gender, level of education and socio-economic status (SES) were significantly associated with KAP.Males (β = 0.393, 95% CI = 0.142-0.643), and any level of education compared to no schooling (β = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.596, 0.857) reported significantly more knowledge, after multivariate adjustments for covariates.Participants aged under 35 years, (odds ratio (OR)= 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.43) had significantly higher positive attitudes towards treatments of diabetes compared to those aged ≥65 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia; Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT

Background: To assess the Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) amongst the general community regarding type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in rural Bangladesh.

Methods: Data was collected using cluster random sampling from 3104 adults residing in a rural district in Bangladesh. Participants underwent a KAP questionnaire survey regarding assessing diabetes, socio-demographic and medical history. Descriptive, Chi-square and regression analyses were performed.

Results: Participants were aged between 30 and 89 years (M = 51, SD= 11.8) and 65.5% were female. The prevalence of diabetes was found to be 8.3%. The majority (93%) reported to have heard of diabetes, yet only 4% knew what a glucose tolerance test was. Only 50% reported that they knew physical inactivity was a risk factor. Age, gender, level of education and socio-economic status (SES) were significantly associated with KAP. A lower proportion (41%) of older participants (aged ≥65 years) reported that they knew that dietary modifications assist in diabetes control compared to those aged less than 35 years (69%), p<0.001. Males (β = 0.393, 95% CI = 0.142-0.643), and any level of education compared to no schooling (β = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.596, 0.857) reported significantly more knowledge, after multivariate adjustments for covariates. Participants aged under 35 years, (odds ratio (OR)= 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.43) had significantly higher positive attitudes towards treatments of diabetes compared to those aged ≥65 years. Of the 99 people with known diabetes, more than 50% (n = 52) never had their blood sugar levels checked since diagnosis.

Conclusions: Knowledge of diabetes and its risk factors is very limited in rural Bangladesh, even in persons diagnosed with type 2 DM. The development of public health programmes to increase knowledge of diabetes and its complications is required to assist people living in rural Bangladesh to control and management of diabetes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus