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Prevalence of stress in junior doctors during their internship training: a cross-sectional study of three Saudi medical colleges' hospitals.

Abdulghani HM, Irshad M, Al Zunitan MA, Al Sulihem AA, Al Dehaim MA, Al Esefir WA, Al Rabiah AM, Kameshki RN, Alrowais NA, Sebiany A, Haque S - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that nearly 73.0% of interns were under stressed conditions.We found a significantly high level of stress among the medical interns.High stress may have negative effects on cognitive functioning, learning, and patient care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Medical science is perceived as a stressful educational career, and medical students experience monstrous stress during their undergraduate studies, internship, and residency training, which affects their cognitive function, practical life, and patient care. In the present study, an assessment of the prevalence of self-perceived stress among new medical graduates during their internship training has been performed, and correlations of self-perceived stress with sex, marital status, and clinical rotations have been evaluated.

Patients and methods: Interns of the King Khalid, King Abdulaziz, and King Fahd University hospitals in Saudi Arabia were invited to complete a stress inventory known as the Kessler 10, which is used for stress measurement. Apart from stress evaluation, the questionnaire collected personal data, such as age, sex, and marital status, in addition to information relevant to hospital training, assigned duties, and clinical training rotations.

Results: Our results showed that nearly 73.0% of interns were under stressed conditions. Most of the interns were affected by a severe level of stress (34.9%), followed by mild (19.3%) and moderate (18.8%) levels of stress. The stress level was significantly higher (84.0%) among female interns in comparison with male interns (66.5%) (odds ratio =2.64; confidence interval =1.59-4.39; P<0.0002). There were statistically significant differences between the percentages of male and female interns (P≤0.047) at mild, moderate, and severe stress levels. Marital status had no role in causing stress. The highest stress level was reported by interns during the clinical rotations of medicine (78.8%), followed by surgery (74.7%), pediatrics (72.4%), obstetrics and gynecology (70.1%), and emergency (58.3%). The prevalence of stress among the interns and their corresponding clinical rotations in all three hospitals had significant linear correlations (r≥0.829, P≤0.041).

Conclusion: We found a significantly high level of stress among the medical interns. High stress may have negative effects on cognitive functioning, learning, and patient care. Hence, medical interns need support and subsequent interventions to cope with stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stress levels among medical interns and clinical cycles in different medical colleges.Abbreviations: Ob/Gyn, obstetrics and gynecology; KKUH, King Khalid University Hospital; KAUH, King Abdulaziz University Hospital; KFHU, King Fahd Hospital of the University.
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f1-ndt-10-1879: Stress levels among medical interns and clinical cycles in different medical colleges.Abbreviations: Ob/Gyn, obstetrics and gynecology; KKUH, King Khalid University Hospital; KAUH, King Abdulaziz University Hospital; KFHU, King Fahd Hospital of the University.

Mentions: The prevalence of stress among the interns of all the three medical colleges in various clinical rotations was quite varied (Table 3). The level of stress was highest in the clinical rotation of medicine (78.8%; n=82) followed by surgery (74.7%; n=62), pediatrics (72.4%; n=55), Ob/Gyn (70.1%; n=54), elective clinics (70.0%; n=28), and emergency clinics (58.3%; n=14). The OR of stress among the interns was highest in medicine (OR =2.66; CI =1.04–6.80), followed by surgery (OR =2.11; CI =0.81–5.45), pediatrics (OR =1.87; CI =0.72–4.85), Ob/Gyn (OR =1.68; CI =0.65–4.32), and elective clinics (OR =1.67; CI =0.58–4.79). The emergency clinical rotation was considered the reference category. Interestingly, stress levels among the interns and their corresponding clinics in all three hospitals were found to be significantly linearly correlated (r≥0.829; P≤0.041). The prevalence of moderate stress was highest in the medicine clinic (27.6%), followed by pediatrics (25.0%), Ob/Gyn (19.7%), surgery (14.5%), and emergency (5.3%). Similarly, the prevalence of severe stress followed the order of medicine (29.8%), Ob/Gyn (19.9%), pediatrics (17.0%), surgery (16.3%), and emergency (5.7%). In KKUH, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics was 41.6% (n=9), 44.7% (n=17), 44.1% (n=15), 41.2% (n=14), 44.4% (n=4), and 56.3% (n=9), respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics of KFHU was 43.8% (n=7), 50.0% (n=6), 54.5% (n=6), 42.9% (n=6), 33.3% (n=1), and 57.0% (n=4), respectively. However, in KAUH, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics was 65.0% (n=13), 58.3% (n=7), 55.6% (n=5), 57.1% (n=4), 50.0% (n=1), and 70.0% (n=3), respectively (Figure 1).


Prevalence of stress in junior doctors during their internship training: a cross-sectional study of three Saudi medical colleges' hospitals.

Abdulghani HM, Irshad M, Al Zunitan MA, Al Sulihem AA, Al Dehaim MA, Al Esefir WA, Al Rabiah AM, Kameshki RN, Alrowais NA, Sebiany A, Haque S - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Stress levels among medical interns and clinical cycles in different medical colleges.Abbreviations: Ob/Gyn, obstetrics and gynecology; KKUH, King Khalid University Hospital; KAUH, King Abdulaziz University Hospital; KFHU, King Fahd Hospital of the University.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196886&req=5

f1-ndt-10-1879: Stress levels among medical interns and clinical cycles in different medical colleges.Abbreviations: Ob/Gyn, obstetrics and gynecology; KKUH, King Khalid University Hospital; KAUH, King Abdulaziz University Hospital; KFHU, King Fahd Hospital of the University.
Mentions: The prevalence of stress among the interns of all the three medical colleges in various clinical rotations was quite varied (Table 3). The level of stress was highest in the clinical rotation of medicine (78.8%; n=82) followed by surgery (74.7%; n=62), pediatrics (72.4%; n=55), Ob/Gyn (70.1%; n=54), elective clinics (70.0%; n=28), and emergency clinics (58.3%; n=14). The OR of stress among the interns was highest in medicine (OR =2.66; CI =1.04–6.80), followed by surgery (OR =2.11; CI =0.81–5.45), pediatrics (OR =1.87; CI =0.72–4.85), Ob/Gyn (OR =1.68; CI =0.65–4.32), and elective clinics (OR =1.67; CI =0.58–4.79). The emergency clinical rotation was considered the reference category. Interestingly, stress levels among the interns and their corresponding clinics in all three hospitals were found to be significantly linearly correlated (r≥0.829; P≤0.041). The prevalence of moderate stress was highest in the medicine clinic (27.6%), followed by pediatrics (25.0%), Ob/Gyn (19.7%), surgery (14.5%), and emergency (5.3%). Similarly, the prevalence of severe stress followed the order of medicine (29.8%), Ob/Gyn (19.9%), pediatrics (17.0%), surgery (16.3%), and emergency (5.7%). In KKUH, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics was 41.6% (n=9), 44.7% (n=17), 44.1% (n=15), 41.2% (n=14), 44.4% (n=4), and 56.3% (n=9), respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics of KFHU was 43.8% (n=7), 50.0% (n=6), 54.5% (n=6), 42.9% (n=6), 33.3% (n=1), and 57.0% (n=4), respectively. However, in KAUH, the prevalence of severe stress in the medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, pediatrics, emergency, and elective clinics was 65.0% (n=13), 58.3% (n=7), 55.6% (n=5), 57.1% (n=4), 50.0% (n=1), and 70.0% (n=3), respectively (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Our results showed that nearly 73.0% of interns were under stressed conditions.We found a significantly high level of stress among the medical interns.High stress may have negative effects on cognitive functioning, learning, and patient care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Medical science is perceived as a stressful educational career, and medical students experience monstrous stress during their undergraduate studies, internship, and residency training, which affects their cognitive function, practical life, and patient care. In the present study, an assessment of the prevalence of self-perceived stress among new medical graduates during their internship training has been performed, and correlations of self-perceived stress with sex, marital status, and clinical rotations have been evaluated.

Patients and methods: Interns of the King Khalid, King Abdulaziz, and King Fahd University hospitals in Saudi Arabia were invited to complete a stress inventory known as the Kessler 10, which is used for stress measurement. Apart from stress evaluation, the questionnaire collected personal data, such as age, sex, and marital status, in addition to information relevant to hospital training, assigned duties, and clinical training rotations.

Results: Our results showed that nearly 73.0% of interns were under stressed conditions. Most of the interns were affected by a severe level of stress (34.9%), followed by mild (19.3%) and moderate (18.8%) levels of stress. The stress level was significantly higher (84.0%) among female interns in comparison with male interns (66.5%) (odds ratio =2.64; confidence interval =1.59-4.39; P<0.0002). There were statistically significant differences between the percentages of male and female interns (P≤0.047) at mild, moderate, and severe stress levels. Marital status had no role in causing stress. The highest stress level was reported by interns during the clinical rotations of medicine (78.8%), followed by surgery (74.7%), pediatrics (72.4%), obstetrics and gynecology (70.1%), and emergency (58.3%). The prevalence of stress among the interns and their corresponding clinical rotations in all three hospitals had significant linear correlations (r≥0.829, P≤0.041).

Conclusion: We found a significantly high level of stress among the medical interns. High stress may have negative effects on cognitive functioning, learning, and patient care. Hence, medical interns need support and subsequent interventions to cope with stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus