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The preference and actual use of different types of rural recreation areas by urban dwellers--the Hamburg case study.

Boll T, von Haaren C, von Ruschkowski E - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers.Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value.When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Environmental Planning, Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In the wake of urbanisation processes and the constitution of metropolitan regions, the role of the city's rural surroundings is receiving more attention from researchers and planners as rural areas offer various (cultural) ecosystem services for the urban population. Urban dwellers increasingly desire recreation and landscape experience. Although this need for recreation is generally recognized, few studies have focused on the question of people's preferences for certain types and characteristics of outdoor recreation areas in relation to the frequency of use. In order to acquire baseline data on this subject, the main objectives of this study were to explore recreation preferences of urban dwellers and the relation between actual use and perceived value of recreation areas in a case study in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (Germany). In a social survey, Hamburg residents (n = 400) were asked about their preferences and use of four important regional recreation areas with different landscape characteristics in face-to-face interviews in different locations in the city. We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers. Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value. When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference. Respondents considered the diversity, uniqueness, and naturalness of the landscape to be far more important than the accessibility of the recreation areas and the provision of service facilities.

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Where outdoor recreation of Hamburg residents takes place (n = 400).
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pone-0108638-g003: Where outdoor recreation of Hamburg residents takes place (n = 400).

Mentions: While both the importance of outdoor recreation within and outside of Hamburg were assessed between fairly and very important on average, the actual use was strongly biased towards recreation within the city (χ2 = 49.688; df = 1; p<0.001). 50.5% of respondents recreated almost exclusively or mainly within the city, while 20.8% almost exclusively or mainly recreated outside of the city (Fig. 3).


The preference and actual use of different types of rural recreation areas by urban dwellers--the Hamburg case study.

Boll T, von Haaren C, von Ruschkowski E - PLoS ONE (2014)

Where outdoor recreation of Hamburg residents takes place (n = 400).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196755&req=5

pone-0108638-g003: Where outdoor recreation of Hamburg residents takes place (n = 400).
Mentions: While both the importance of outdoor recreation within and outside of Hamburg were assessed between fairly and very important on average, the actual use was strongly biased towards recreation within the city (χ2 = 49.688; df = 1; p<0.001). 50.5% of respondents recreated almost exclusively or mainly within the city, while 20.8% almost exclusively or mainly recreated outside of the city (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers.Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value.When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Environmental Planning, Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In the wake of urbanisation processes and the constitution of metropolitan regions, the role of the city's rural surroundings is receiving more attention from researchers and planners as rural areas offer various (cultural) ecosystem services for the urban population. Urban dwellers increasingly desire recreation and landscape experience. Although this need for recreation is generally recognized, few studies have focused on the question of people's preferences for certain types and characteristics of outdoor recreation areas in relation to the frequency of use. In order to acquire baseline data on this subject, the main objectives of this study were to explore recreation preferences of urban dwellers and the relation between actual use and perceived value of recreation areas in a case study in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (Germany). In a social survey, Hamburg residents (n = 400) were asked about their preferences and use of four important regional recreation areas with different landscape characteristics in face-to-face interviews in different locations in the city. We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers. Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value. When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference. Respondents considered the diversity, uniqueness, and naturalness of the landscape to be far more important than the accessibility of the recreation areas and the provision of service facilities.

Show MeSH