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A temporal basis for Weber's law in value perception.

Namboodiri VM, Mihalas S, Hussain Shuler MG - Front Integr Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: We show that the precision of reward magnitude perception is correlated with the precision of time perception and that Weber's law in time estimation can lead to Weber's law in value perception.The strength of this correlation is predicted to depend on the reward history of the animal.Subsequently, we show that sensory integration noise (either alone or in combination with time estimation noise) also leads to Weber's law in reward magnitude perception in an accumulator model, if it has balanced Poisson feedback.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Weber's law-the observation that the ability to perceive changes in magnitudes of stimuli is proportional to the magnitude-is a widely observed psychophysical phenomenon. It is also believed to underlie the perception of reward magnitudes and the passage of time. Since many ecological theories state that animals attempt to maximize reward rates, errors in the perception of reward magnitudes and delays must affect decision-making. Using an ecological theory of decision-making (TIMERR), we analyze the effect of multiple sources of noise (sensory noise, time estimation noise, and integration noise) on reward magnitude and subjective value perception. We show that the precision of reward magnitude perception is correlated with the precision of time perception and that Weber's law in time estimation can lead to Weber's law in value perception. The strength of this correlation is predicted to depend on the reward history of the animal. Subsequently, we show that sensory integration noise (either alone or in combination with time estimation noise) also leads to Weber's law in reward magnitude perception in an accumulator model, if it has balanced Poisson feedback. We then demonstrate that the noise in subjective value of a delayed reward, due to the combined effect of noise in both the perception of reward magnitude and delay, also abides by Weber's law. Thus, in our theory we prove analytically that the perception of reward magnitude, time, and subjective value change all approximately obey Weber's law.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Confirmatory simulations (see Methods) of the analytical solution of an accumulator model in which the sensory and feedback noise combine multiplicatively. The red line shows the result of the analytical calculation as expressed in Equation (23) wherein the sensory signal (a), magnitude of sensory noise (b), and the magnitude of feedback noise (σ) are varied. The black dots show the results of numerical simulation. Here, Weber's law is exact.
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Figure 5: Confirmatory simulations (see Methods) of the analytical solution of an accumulator model in which the sensory and feedback noise combine multiplicatively. The red line shows the result of the analytical calculation as expressed in Equation (23) wherein the sensory signal (a), magnitude of sensory noise (b), and the magnitude of feedback noise (σ) are varied. The black dots show the results of numerical simulation. Here, Weber's law is exact.

Mentions: Again, we performed confirmatory numerical simulations of Equation (22), the results of which are shown in Figure 5. Therefore, if the sensory input noise is multiplicative, the coefficient of variation is exactly constant, thus making Weber's law exact. Instead, if the sensory input noise is additive, the coefficient of variation shows deviations from exact Weber's law at low reward magnitudes.


A temporal basis for Weber's law in value perception.

Namboodiri VM, Mihalas S, Hussain Shuler MG - Front Integr Neurosci (2014)

Confirmatory simulations (see Methods) of the analytical solution of an accumulator model in which the sensory and feedback noise combine multiplicatively. The red line shows the result of the analytical calculation as expressed in Equation (23) wherein the sensory signal (a), magnitude of sensory noise (b), and the magnitude of feedback noise (σ) are varied. The black dots show the results of numerical simulation. Here, Weber's law is exact.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196632&req=5

Figure 5: Confirmatory simulations (see Methods) of the analytical solution of an accumulator model in which the sensory and feedback noise combine multiplicatively. The red line shows the result of the analytical calculation as expressed in Equation (23) wherein the sensory signal (a), magnitude of sensory noise (b), and the magnitude of feedback noise (σ) are varied. The black dots show the results of numerical simulation. Here, Weber's law is exact.
Mentions: Again, we performed confirmatory numerical simulations of Equation (22), the results of which are shown in Figure 5. Therefore, if the sensory input noise is multiplicative, the coefficient of variation is exactly constant, thus making Weber's law exact. Instead, if the sensory input noise is additive, the coefficient of variation shows deviations from exact Weber's law at low reward magnitudes.

Bottom Line: We show that the precision of reward magnitude perception is correlated with the precision of time perception and that Weber's law in time estimation can lead to Weber's law in value perception.The strength of this correlation is predicted to depend on the reward history of the animal.Subsequently, we show that sensory integration noise (either alone or in combination with time estimation noise) also leads to Weber's law in reward magnitude perception in an accumulator model, if it has balanced Poisson feedback.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Weber's law-the observation that the ability to perceive changes in magnitudes of stimuli is proportional to the magnitude-is a widely observed psychophysical phenomenon. It is also believed to underlie the perception of reward magnitudes and the passage of time. Since many ecological theories state that animals attempt to maximize reward rates, errors in the perception of reward magnitudes and delays must affect decision-making. Using an ecological theory of decision-making (TIMERR), we analyze the effect of multiple sources of noise (sensory noise, time estimation noise, and integration noise) on reward magnitude and subjective value perception. We show that the precision of reward magnitude perception is correlated with the precision of time perception and that Weber's law in time estimation can lead to Weber's law in value perception. The strength of this correlation is predicted to depend on the reward history of the animal. Subsequently, we show that sensory integration noise (either alone or in combination with time estimation noise) also leads to Weber's law in reward magnitude perception in an accumulator model, if it has balanced Poisson feedback. We then demonstrate that the noise in subjective value of a delayed reward, due to the combined effect of noise in both the perception of reward magnitude and delay, also abides by Weber's law. Thus, in our theory we prove analytically that the perception of reward magnitude, time, and subjective value change all approximately obey Weber's law.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus