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Do severity score and skin temperature asymmetry correlate with the subjective pain score in the patients with complex regional pain syndrome?

Jeon SG, Choi EJ, Lee PB, Lee YJ, Kim MS, Seo JH, Nahm FS - Korean J Pain (2014)

Bottom Line: A total of 42 patients were included in this study.There was no significant correlation between the ΔT and VAS score (Spearman's rho = 0.066, P = 0.677).Also, the CSS and VAS score showed no significant correlation (Spearman's rho = 0.163, P = 0.303).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, KEPCO Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: The diagnostic criteria of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have mainly focused on dichotomous (yes/no) categorization, which makes it difficult to compare the inter-patient's condition and to evaluate the intra-patient's subtle severity over the course of time. To overcome this limitation, many efforts have been made to create laboratory methods or scoring systems to reflect the severity of CRPS; measurement of the skin temperature asymmetry is one of the former, and the CRPS severity score (CSS) is one of the latter. However, there has been no study on the correlations among the CSS, temperature asymmetry and subjective pain score. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the CSS, skin temperature asymmetry and subjective pain score.

Methods: Patients affected with CRPS in a unilateral limb were included in this study. After making a diagnosis of CRPS according to the Budapest criteria, the CSS and skin temperature difference between the affected and unaffected limb (ΔT) was measured in each patient. Finally, we conducted a correlation analysis among the CSS, ΔT and visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the patients.

Results: A total of 42 patients were included in this study. There was no significant correlation between the ΔT and VAS score (Spearman's rho = 0.066, P = 0.677). Also, the CSS and VAS score showed no significant correlation (Spearman's rho = 0.163, P = 0.303).

Conclusions: The ΔT and CSS do not seem to reflect the degree of subjective pain in CRPS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of visual analogue scale (VAS) score, complex regional pain syndrome severity scores (CSS), and skin temperature difference (ΔT).
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Figure 1: Distribution of visual analogue scale (VAS) score, complex regional pain syndrome severity scores (CSS), and skin temperature difference (ΔT).

Mentions: A total of 42 patients participated in this study, and the demographic data is illustrated in Table 3. The ΔT calculated from the IRT measurement was 3.0 ± 2.3℃; the VAS score (10 cm) was 7.6 ± 1.7, and the CSS was 11.7 ± 2.8. The distribution of the VAS score, CSS and ΔT is shown in Fig. 1.


Do severity score and skin temperature asymmetry correlate with the subjective pain score in the patients with complex regional pain syndrome?

Jeon SG, Choi EJ, Lee PB, Lee YJ, Kim MS, Seo JH, Nahm FS - Korean J Pain (2014)

Distribution of visual analogue scale (VAS) score, complex regional pain syndrome severity scores (CSS), and skin temperature difference (ΔT).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196499&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of visual analogue scale (VAS) score, complex regional pain syndrome severity scores (CSS), and skin temperature difference (ΔT).
Mentions: A total of 42 patients participated in this study, and the demographic data is illustrated in Table 3. The ΔT calculated from the IRT measurement was 3.0 ± 2.3℃; the VAS score (10 cm) was 7.6 ± 1.7, and the CSS was 11.7 ± 2.8. The distribution of the VAS score, CSS and ΔT is shown in Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: A total of 42 patients were included in this study.There was no significant correlation between the ΔT and VAS score (Spearman's rho = 0.066, P = 0.677).Also, the CSS and VAS score showed no significant correlation (Spearman's rho = 0.163, P = 0.303).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, KEPCO Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: The diagnostic criteria of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have mainly focused on dichotomous (yes/no) categorization, which makes it difficult to compare the inter-patient's condition and to evaluate the intra-patient's subtle severity over the course of time. To overcome this limitation, many efforts have been made to create laboratory methods or scoring systems to reflect the severity of CRPS; measurement of the skin temperature asymmetry is one of the former, and the CRPS severity score (CSS) is one of the latter. However, there has been no study on the correlations among the CSS, temperature asymmetry and subjective pain score. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the CSS, skin temperature asymmetry and subjective pain score.

Methods: Patients affected with CRPS in a unilateral limb were included in this study. After making a diagnosis of CRPS according to the Budapest criteria, the CSS and skin temperature difference between the affected and unaffected limb (ΔT) was measured in each patient. Finally, we conducted a correlation analysis among the CSS, ΔT and visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the patients.

Results: A total of 42 patients were included in this study. There was no significant correlation between the ΔT and VAS score (Spearman's rho = 0.066, P = 0.677). Also, the CSS and VAS score showed no significant correlation (Spearman's rho = 0.163, P = 0.303).

Conclusions: The ΔT and CSS do not seem to reflect the degree of subjective pain in CRPS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus