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Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility.

Mallorquí-Bagué N, Garfinkel SN, Engels M, Eccles JA, Pailhez G, Bulbena A, Critchley HD - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased "interoceptive" sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex.Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex Falmer, UK ; Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain ; Department of Psychiatry, Psychology and Psychosomatics, Hospital Universitari Quirón Dexeus Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased "interoceptive" sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal. Joint hypermobility, an expression of a common variation in the connective tissue protein collagen, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor to anxiety and related disorders. This study explored the link between anxiety, interoceptive sensitivity and hypermobility in a sub-clinical population using neuroimaging and psychophysiological evaluation.

Methods: Thirty-six healthy volunteers undertook interoceptive sensitivity tests, a clinical examination for hypermobility and completed validated questionnaire measures of state anxiety and body awareness tendency. Nineteen participants also performed an emotional processing paradigm during functional neuroimaging.

Results: We confirmed a significant relationship between state anxiety score and joint hypermobility. Interoceptive sensitivity mediated the relationship between state anxiety and hypermobility. Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex.

Conclusions: Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic showing the regression coefficients, with the coefficients (β) for the effect of hypermobility on state anxiety with the latter (when entering interoception into the model) in parentheses.
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Figure 1: Schematic showing the regression coefficients, with the coefficients (β) for the effect of hypermobility on state anxiety with the latter (when entering interoception into the model) in parentheses.

Mentions: When exploring the relationship between joint hypermobility, state anxiety and interoceptive sensitivity (by means of heartbeat mental tracking task); interoception was observed to mediate the association between joint hypermobility and state anxiety (Figure 1).


Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility.

Mallorquí-Bagué N, Garfinkel SN, Engels M, Eccles JA, Pailhez G, Bulbena A, Critchley HD - Front Psychol (2014)

Schematic showing the regression coefficients, with the coefficients (β) for the effect of hypermobility on state anxiety with the latter (when entering interoception into the model) in parentheses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196473&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic showing the regression coefficients, with the coefficients (β) for the effect of hypermobility on state anxiety with the latter (when entering interoception into the model) in parentheses.
Mentions: When exploring the relationship between joint hypermobility, state anxiety and interoceptive sensitivity (by means of heartbeat mental tracking task); interoception was observed to mediate the association between joint hypermobility and state anxiety (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased "interoceptive" sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex.Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex Falmer, UK ; Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain ; Department of Psychiatry, Psychology and Psychosomatics, Hospital Universitari Quirón Dexeus Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased "interoceptive" sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal. Joint hypermobility, an expression of a common variation in the connective tissue protein collagen, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor to anxiety and related disorders. This study explored the link between anxiety, interoceptive sensitivity and hypermobility in a sub-clinical population using neuroimaging and psychophysiological evaluation.

Methods: Thirty-six healthy volunteers undertook interoceptive sensitivity tests, a clinical examination for hypermobility and completed validated questionnaire measures of state anxiety and body awareness tendency. Nineteen participants also performed an emotional processing paradigm during functional neuroimaging.

Results: We confirmed a significant relationship between state anxiety score and joint hypermobility. Interoceptive sensitivity mediated the relationship between state anxiety and hypermobility. Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex.

Conclusions: Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus