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Genomic evidence for a globally distributed, bimodal population in the ovine footrot pathogen Dichelobacter nodosus.

Kennan RM, Gilhuus M, Frosth S, Seemann T, Dhungyel OP, Whittington RJ, Boyce JD, Powell DR, Aspán A, Jørgensen HJ, Bulach DM, Rood JI - MBio (2014)

Bottom Line: However, single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the 31,627 nucleotides that were found to differ in one or more of the 103 sequenced isolates divided them into two distinct clades.To determine the relationship between virulent and benign isolates and the relationship of isolates from different geographical regions, a genomic study that involved the sequencing and subsequent analysis of 103 D. nodosus isolates was undertaken.The results showed that D. nodosus isolates are highly conserved at the genomic level but that they can be divided into two distinct clades that correlate with their disease phenotypes and with a single amino acid substitution in one of the extracellular proteases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparative analysis of sequences from Australia. (A) BRIG diagram showing an overview of the genomic relationship between VCS1703A and the 38 sequenced isolates of D. nodosus originating from Australia. The major color groups are light blue for New South Wales (NSW), dark blue for Victoria (VIC), red for South Australia (SA), green for Tasmania (TAS), yellow for Western Australia (WA), and gray for isolates of unknown origin in Australia (AU). (B) Network diagram showing the relationship between the genome sequences of the 38 D. nodosus isolates from Australia sequenced as part of this study. The methodology is as described in the legend of Fig. 2.
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fig5: Comparative analysis of sequences from Australia. (A) BRIG diagram showing an overview of the genomic relationship between VCS1703A and the 38 sequenced isolates of D. nodosus originating from Australia. The major color groups are light blue for New South Wales (NSW), dark blue for Victoria (VIC), red for South Australia (SA), green for Tasmania (TAS), yellow for Western Australia (WA), and gray for isolates of unknown origin in Australia (AU). (B) Network diagram showing the relationship between the genome sequences of the 38 D. nodosus isolates from Australia sequenced as part of this study. The methodology is as described in the legend of Fig. 2.

Mentions: The vrl region was present in the historical virulent Australian isolates but was absent from the more recent isolates from Tasmania and South Australia (Fig. 5A). SNP analysis (Fig. 5B) revealed that the Australian clade I isolates, but not the clade II isolates, formed clusters, with most of the historical isolates forming one large cluster. The more recent isolates from Tasmania formed two distinct clusters, possibly indicating that these isolates, which remained in the population after a vaccination program, were derived from two different strains. The three South Australian isolates also grouped into a distinct cluster. Finally, two of the isolates from Western Australia grouped into a cluster quite separate from the other historical isolates, which was consistent with previous observation suggesting that isolates from this state were different from other Australian isolates (10). The clustering of distinct sets of related isolates may indicate some sampling bias; the sequencing of more isolates will be required to build a complete picture of the genetic diversity of the virulent D. nodosus isolates present in Australia, where virulent footrot has been endemic over an extended period of time.


Genomic evidence for a globally distributed, bimodal population in the ovine footrot pathogen Dichelobacter nodosus.

Kennan RM, Gilhuus M, Frosth S, Seemann T, Dhungyel OP, Whittington RJ, Boyce JD, Powell DR, Aspán A, Jørgensen HJ, Bulach DM, Rood JI - MBio (2014)

Comparative analysis of sequences from Australia. (A) BRIG diagram showing an overview of the genomic relationship between VCS1703A and the 38 sequenced isolates of D. nodosus originating from Australia. The major color groups are light blue for New South Wales (NSW), dark blue for Victoria (VIC), red for South Australia (SA), green for Tasmania (TAS), yellow for Western Australia (WA), and gray for isolates of unknown origin in Australia (AU). (B) Network diagram showing the relationship between the genome sequences of the 38 D. nodosus isolates from Australia sequenced as part of this study. The methodology is as described in the legend of Fig. 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196234&req=5

fig5: Comparative analysis of sequences from Australia. (A) BRIG diagram showing an overview of the genomic relationship between VCS1703A and the 38 sequenced isolates of D. nodosus originating from Australia. The major color groups are light blue for New South Wales (NSW), dark blue for Victoria (VIC), red for South Australia (SA), green for Tasmania (TAS), yellow for Western Australia (WA), and gray for isolates of unknown origin in Australia (AU). (B) Network diagram showing the relationship between the genome sequences of the 38 D. nodosus isolates from Australia sequenced as part of this study. The methodology is as described in the legend of Fig. 2.
Mentions: The vrl region was present in the historical virulent Australian isolates but was absent from the more recent isolates from Tasmania and South Australia (Fig. 5A). SNP analysis (Fig. 5B) revealed that the Australian clade I isolates, but not the clade II isolates, formed clusters, with most of the historical isolates forming one large cluster. The more recent isolates from Tasmania formed two distinct clusters, possibly indicating that these isolates, which remained in the population after a vaccination program, were derived from two different strains. The three South Australian isolates also grouped into a distinct cluster. Finally, two of the isolates from Western Australia grouped into a cluster quite separate from the other historical isolates, which was consistent with previous observation suggesting that isolates from this state were different from other Australian isolates (10). The clustering of distinct sets of related isolates may indicate some sampling bias; the sequencing of more isolates will be required to build a complete picture of the genetic diversity of the virulent D. nodosus isolates present in Australia, where virulent footrot has been endemic over an extended period of time.

Bottom Line: However, single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the 31,627 nucleotides that were found to differ in one or more of the 103 sequenced isolates divided them into two distinct clades.To determine the relationship between virulent and benign isolates and the relationship of isolates from different geographical regions, a genomic study that involved the sequencing and subsequent analysis of 103 D. nodosus isolates was undertaken.The results showed that D. nodosus isolates are highly conserved at the genomic level but that they can be divided into two distinct clades that correlate with their disease phenotypes and with a single amino acid substitution in one of the extracellular proteases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus