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Differential genome evolution between companion symbionts in an insect-bacterial symbiosis.

Bennett GM, McCutcheon JP, MacDonald BR, Romanovicz D, Moran NA - MBio (2014)

Bottom Line: Phylogenomic results suggest that "Ca.Taken together, our results suggest that the two "Ca.We found that the older symbiont has a highly reduced genome with low rates of mutation and gene loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA gordon.bennett@utexas.edu.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Bar chart showing distribution of functional categories of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) for predicted protein-coding genes for “Ca. Baumannia cicadellinicola” and “Ca. Sulcia muelleri” from BGSS and GWSS. Bars are color coded according to genome (see key). ORFS, open reading frames.
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fig2: Bar chart showing distribution of functional categories of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) for predicted protein-coding genes for “Ca. Baumannia cicadellinicola” and “Ca. Sulcia muelleri” from BGSS and GWSS. Bars are color coded according to genome (see key). ORFS, open reading frames.

Mentions: The genome sizes for S-BGSS and B-BGSS are 244,618 and 759,425 bp, respectively (Fig. 1). Both symbionts have low GC content, which is typical in obligate symbioses: the GC content is 17% for S-BGSS and 39% for B-BGSS. B-BGSS contains 694 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDS), of which 20 encode hypothetical proteins. It contains two ribosomal cassettes, 39 tRNAs, and 10 CDS that are truncated or pseudogenized with uncertain function (see Table S2 in the supplemental material). S-BGSS has 225 CDS, with 10 encoding hypothetical proteins, a single ribosomal cassette, 31 tRNAs, and no identifiable pseudogenes (Table S3). Figure 2 shows clusters of orthologous groups (COG) assignments for genes in both symbiont genomes from BGSS and GWSS. For B-BGSS, 69 genes could not be assigned.


Differential genome evolution between companion symbionts in an insect-bacterial symbiosis.

Bennett GM, McCutcheon JP, MacDonald BR, Romanovicz D, Moran NA - MBio (2014)

Bar chart showing distribution of functional categories of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) for predicted protein-coding genes for “Ca. Baumannia cicadellinicola” and “Ca. Sulcia muelleri” from BGSS and GWSS. Bars are color coded according to genome (see key). ORFS, open reading frames.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196230&req=5

fig2: Bar chart showing distribution of functional categories of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) for predicted protein-coding genes for “Ca. Baumannia cicadellinicola” and “Ca. Sulcia muelleri” from BGSS and GWSS. Bars are color coded according to genome (see key). ORFS, open reading frames.
Mentions: The genome sizes for S-BGSS and B-BGSS are 244,618 and 759,425 bp, respectively (Fig. 1). Both symbionts have low GC content, which is typical in obligate symbioses: the GC content is 17% for S-BGSS and 39% for B-BGSS. B-BGSS contains 694 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDS), of which 20 encode hypothetical proteins. It contains two ribosomal cassettes, 39 tRNAs, and 10 CDS that are truncated or pseudogenized with uncertain function (see Table S2 in the supplemental material). S-BGSS has 225 CDS, with 10 encoding hypothetical proteins, a single ribosomal cassette, 31 tRNAs, and no identifiable pseudogenes (Table S3). Figure 2 shows clusters of orthologous groups (COG) assignments for genes in both symbiont genomes from BGSS and GWSS. For B-BGSS, 69 genes could not be assigned.

Bottom Line: Phylogenomic results suggest that "Ca.Taken together, our results suggest that the two "Ca.We found that the older symbiont has a highly reduced genome with low rates of mutation and gene loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA gordon.bennett@utexas.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus