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The impact of community mobilisation on HIV prevention in middle and low income countries: a systematic review and critique.

Cornish F, Priego-Hernandez J, Campbell C, Mburu G, McLean S - AIDS Behav (2014)

Bottom Line: Among most at risk groups (particularly sex workers), the evidence is somewhat consistent, indicating a tendency for positive impact, with stronger results for behavioural and social outcomes than for biomedical ones.Among youth and general communities, the evidence remains inconclusive.We suggest that the inconclusiveness of the findings reflects problems with the evidence, rather than indicating that CM is ineffective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Methodology, The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
While community mobilisation (CM) is increasingly advocated for HIV prevention, its impact on measurable outcomes has not been established. We performed a systematic review of the impact of CM within HIV prevention interventions (N = 20), on biomedical, behavioural and social outcomes. Among most at risk groups (particularly sex workers), the evidence is somewhat consistent, indicating a tendency for positive impact, with stronger results for behavioural and social outcomes than for biomedical ones. Among youth and general communities, the evidence remains inconclusive. Success appears to be enhanced by engaging groups with a strong collective identity and by simultaneously addressing the socio-political context. We suggest that the inconclusiveness of the findings reflects problems with the evidence, rather than indicating that CM is ineffective. We discuss weaknesses in the operationalization of CM, neglect of social context, and incompatibility between context-specific CM processes and the aspiration of review methodologies to provide simple, context-transcending answers.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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Fig1: Flow of information chart

Mentions: Standard systematic review procedures were followed (Fig. 1). The bibliographic databases SCOPUS, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycInfo were interrogated using free-text terms to produce a sensitive search, adjusting terms depending on the search tools available (e.g. truncation). Searches included a combination of the following terms: “intervention” AND “hiv OR aids” AND “community mobili*” OR “community particip*” OR “community led” OR “community based” OR “community activit*” OR “community development” OR “capacity building” (full search strings by database in supplementary online information). When possible, irrelevant publication types (e.g. commentaries) were excluded using search tools. A complementary search was carried out through expert consultation and systematic reference screening of previous related reviews [12, 33, 34], which rendered 32 records.Fig. 1


The impact of community mobilisation on HIV prevention in middle and low income countries: a systematic review and critique.

Cornish F, Priego-Hernandez J, Campbell C, Mburu G, McLean S - AIDS Behav (2014)

Flow of information chart
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196137&req=5

Fig1: Flow of information chart
Mentions: Standard systematic review procedures were followed (Fig. 1). The bibliographic databases SCOPUS, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycInfo were interrogated using free-text terms to produce a sensitive search, adjusting terms depending on the search tools available (e.g. truncation). Searches included a combination of the following terms: “intervention” AND “hiv OR aids” AND “community mobili*” OR “community particip*” OR “community led” OR “community based” OR “community activit*” OR “community development” OR “capacity building” (full search strings by database in supplementary online information). When possible, irrelevant publication types (e.g. commentaries) were excluded using search tools. A complementary search was carried out through expert consultation and systematic reference screening of previous related reviews [12, 33, 34], which rendered 32 records.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Among most at risk groups (particularly sex workers), the evidence is somewhat consistent, indicating a tendency for positive impact, with stronger results for behavioural and social outcomes than for biomedical ones.Among youth and general communities, the evidence remains inconclusive.We suggest that the inconclusiveness of the findings reflects problems with the evidence, rather than indicating that CM is ineffective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Methodology, The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
While community mobilisation (CM) is increasingly advocated for HIV prevention, its impact on measurable outcomes has not been established. We performed a systematic review of the impact of CM within HIV prevention interventions (N = 20), on biomedical, behavioural and social outcomes. Among most at risk groups (particularly sex workers), the evidence is somewhat consistent, indicating a tendency for positive impact, with stronger results for behavioural and social outcomes than for biomedical ones. Among youth and general communities, the evidence remains inconclusive. Success appears to be enhanced by engaging groups with a strong collective identity and by simultaneously addressing the socio-political context. We suggest that the inconclusiveness of the findings reflects problems with the evidence, rather than indicating that CM is ineffective. We discuss weaknesses in the operationalization of CM, neglect of social context, and incompatibility between context-specific CM processes and the aspiration of review methodologies to provide simple, context-transcending answers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus