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Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study.

Urrila AS, Karlsson L, Kiviruusu O, Pankakoski M, Pelkonen M, Strandholm T, Marttunen M, Adolescent Depression Study gro - BMC Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: All sleep complaints were less frequent at one-year follow-up compared to baseline.Baseline sleep complaints did not adversely affect clinical outcome at one-year follow-up: severity of the sleep complaints at baseline was associated with a steeper improvement of depressive and anxiety symptoms, suicidality/self-harm symptoms, and overall psychosocial functioning over time.Our results suggest that sleep disturbances at baseline do not necessarily lead to poorer clinical outcome during follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up.

Methods: A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13-19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings. Sleep symptoms and psychiatric symptoms were assessed with interviews and self-report questionnaires.

Results: All sleep complaints were less frequent at one-year follow-up compared to baseline. Baseline sleep complaints did not adversely affect clinical outcome at one-year follow-up: severity of the sleep complaints at baseline was associated with a steeper improvement of depressive and anxiety symptoms, suicidality/self-harm symptoms, and overall psychosocial functioning over time.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that sleep disturbances at baseline do not necessarily lead to poorer clinical outcome during follow-up. Larger longitudinal studies combining both subjective and objective measures of sleep in depressed adolescents are needed to clarify the link between sleep and depression further.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The prevalence (% of the total sample; n = 142) of different sleep complaints among adolescents with MDD at baseline and at one-year follow-up. The adolescents are grouped according to MDD status (remission, recurrent, persistent) at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia represents any significant complaints of insomnia (initial, middle or terminal). At one-year follow-up, sleep data for more than one item was missing for n = 8 adolescents.
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Fig1: The prevalence (% of the total sample; n = 142) of different sleep complaints among adolescents with MDD at baseline and at one-year follow-up. The adolescents are grouped according to MDD status (remission, recurrent, persistent) at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia represents any significant complaints of insomnia (initial, middle or terminal). At one-year follow-up, sleep data for more than one item was missing for n = 8 adolescents.

Mentions: At follow-up, sleep complaints were mainly observed in adolescents with persistent or recurrent depression (Figure 1). Sleep complaints were very rare in patients who had remitted from their baseline MDD episode: only three of them suffered from insomnia, two from non-restorative sleep, one from hypersomnia, and one from frequent nightmares. The recurrent and persistent subgroups did not differ from each other in terms of any sleep complaint (χ2 tests n.s.) except for middle insomnia, which was more common in adolescents with recurrent depression (χ2 = 8.37, p = 0.013).Figure 1


Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study.

Urrila AS, Karlsson L, Kiviruusu O, Pankakoski M, Pelkonen M, Strandholm T, Marttunen M, Adolescent Depression Study gro - BMC Psychiatry (2014)

The prevalence (% of the total sample; n = 142) of different sleep complaints among adolescents with MDD at baseline and at one-year follow-up. The adolescents are grouped according to MDD status (remission, recurrent, persistent) at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia represents any significant complaints of insomnia (initial, middle or terminal). At one-year follow-up, sleep data for more than one item was missing for n = 8 adolescents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4196090&req=5

Fig1: The prevalence (% of the total sample; n = 142) of different sleep complaints among adolescents with MDD at baseline and at one-year follow-up. The adolescents are grouped according to MDD status (remission, recurrent, persistent) at 1-year follow-up. Insomnia represents any significant complaints of insomnia (initial, middle or terminal). At one-year follow-up, sleep data for more than one item was missing for n = 8 adolescents.
Mentions: At follow-up, sleep complaints were mainly observed in adolescents with persistent or recurrent depression (Figure 1). Sleep complaints were very rare in patients who had remitted from their baseline MDD episode: only three of them suffered from insomnia, two from non-restorative sleep, one from hypersomnia, and one from frequent nightmares. The recurrent and persistent subgroups did not differ from each other in terms of any sleep complaint (χ2 tests n.s.) except for middle insomnia, which was more common in adolescents with recurrent depression (χ2 = 8.37, p = 0.013).Figure 1

Bottom Line: All sleep complaints were less frequent at one-year follow-up compared to baseline.Baseline sleep complaints did not adversely affect clinical outcome at one-year follow-up: severity of the sleep complaints at baseline was associated with a steeper improvement of depressive and anxiety symptoms, suicidality/self-harm symptoms, and overall psychosocial functioning over time.Our results suggest that sleep disturbances at baseline do not necessarily lead to poorer clinical outcome during follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up.

Methods: A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13-19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings. Sleep symptoms and psychiatric symptoms were assessed with interviews and self-report questionnaires.

Results: All sleep complaints were less frequent at one-year follow-up compared to baseline. Baseline sleep complaints did not adversely affect clinical outcome at one-year follow-up: severity of the sleep complaints at baseline was associated with a steeper improvement of depressive and anxiety symptoms, suicidality/self-harm symptoms, and overall psychosocial functioning over time.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that sleep disturbances at baseline do not necessarily lead to poorer clinical outcome during follow-up. Larger longitudinal studies combining both subjective and objective measures of sleep in depressed adolescents are needed to clarify the link between sleep and depression further.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus