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Prevalence of internet and social media usage in orthopedic surgery.

Curry E, Li X, Nguyen J, Matzkin E - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2014)

Bottom Line: Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media.Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment.In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital , Boston, MA.

ABSTRACT
Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001). Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day's travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Percentage of services surveyed within the orthopaedic department. B) Overall social media use in the entire patient population surveyed.
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fig001: A) Percentage of services surveyed within the orthopaedic department. B) Overall social media use in the entire patient population surveyed.

Mentions: Of the 752 responses, there were 66% female and 34% male responses (Table 1). Responses were obtained from hand (142), sports medicine (303), foot and ankle (129), joints/tumor (95) and trauma (83) services (Figure 1A). Overall, 51% of all patients surveyed report using social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter (Figure 1B). Of the patients that report not using social network sites, 92% are over the age of 40. Joints/tumor patients most commonly had seen another orthopaedic surgeon prior to their visit (59%) and had prior surgery (42%). Most patients traveled under 60 miles and were referred by their primary care physicians. Between 18-26% of all patients used a physician review website before consultation. However, only 2% of all surveyed patients have actually posted a review onto a Physician Review website. Majority of the patients prefer communicating with their physician via the phone (68%) compared to email (32%). Independent associations found that sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001) (Table 2).


Prevalence of internet and social media usage in orthopedic surgery.

Curry E, Li X, Nguyen J, Matzkin E - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2014)

A) Percentage of services surveyed within the orthopaedic department. B) Overall social media use in the entire patient population surveyed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195991&req=5

fig001: A) Percentage of services surveyed within the orthopaedic department. B) Overall social media use in the entire patient population surveyed.
Mentions: Of the 752 responses, there were 66% female and 34% male responses (Table 1). Responses were obtained from hand (142), sports medicine (303), foot and ankle (129), joints/tumor (95) and trauma (83) services (Figure 1A). Overall, 51% of all patients surveyed report using social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter (Figure 1B). Of the patients that report not using social network sites, 92% are over the age of 40. Joints/tumor patients most commonly had seen another orthopaedic surgeon prior to their visit (59%) and had prior surgery (42%). Most patients traveled under 60 miles and were referred by their primary care physicians. Between 18-26% of all patients used a physician review website before consultation. However, only 2% of all surveyed patients have actually posted a review onto a Physician Review website. Majority of the patients prefer communicating with their physician via the phone (68%) compared to email (32%). Independent associations found that sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001) (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media.Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment.In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital , Boston, MA.

ABSTRACT
Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001). Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day's travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus