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Levels of neuropeptide Y in synovial fluid relate to pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Wang L, Zhang L, Pan H, Peng S, Lv M, Lu WW - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: Concentrations of NPY in synovial fluid were significantly higher in KOA patients (124.7 ± 33.4 pg/mL) compared with controls (64.8 ± 26.3 pg/mL) (p = 0.0297).Within the KOA group, significantly higher concentrations of NPY were found in each subgroup as pain intensified (no pain 81.4 ± 11.7 pg/mL, mild pain 99.1 ± 23.2 pg/mL, moderate pain 119.9 ± 31.5 pg/mL, strong pain 171.2 ± 37.3 pg/mL and severe pain 197.3 ± 41.9 pg/mL).Concentrations of NPY in advanced stage group of KOA patients has no significant difference compare with middle stage group of KOA patients (p = 0. 2175).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, 1068 Xueyuan Avenue, 518055 Shenzhen, China. wldzzs@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The precise etiology of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) pain remains highly controversial and there is no known effective treatment. Due to the known and suggested effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on pain, we have sought to investigate the relationship between the concentration of NPY in synovial fluid of knee, pain of KOA, and structural severity of KOA.

Methods: One hundred KOA patients and twenty healthy participants (control group) were recruited. The pain and the radiographic grade of KOA were assessed separately by Hideo Watanabe's pain score and Tomihisa Koshino's scoring system. Synovial fluid of knee from all participants was collected with arthrocentesis. Radioimmunoassay was used to examine the concentration of NPY in synovial fluid of knee.

Results: Concentrations of NPY in synovial fluid were significantly higher in KOA patients (124.7 ± 33.4 pg/mL) compared with controls (64.8 ± 26.3 pg/mL) (p = 0.0297). According to Hideo Watanabe's pain score, 100 KOA patients were divided into 5 subgroups: no pain (n = 12), mild pain (n = 25), moderate pain (n = 37), strong pain (n = 19) and severe pain (n = 7). Within the KOA group, significantly higher concentrations of NPY were found in each subgroup as pain intensified (no pain 81.4 ± 11.7 pg/mL, mild pain 99.1 ± 23.2 pg/mL, moderate pain 119.9 ± 31.5 pg/mL, strong pain 171.2 ± 37.3 pg/mL and severe pain 197.3 ± 41.9 pg/mL). Meanwhile, according to Tomihisa Koshino's scoring system, 100 KOA patients were divided into 3 subgroups: early stage (n = 30), middle stage (n = 53), advanced stage (n = 17). Concentrations of NPY in middle and advanced stage groups of KOA patients were significant higher than early stage group of KOA patients (early stage 96.4 ± 27.1 pg/mL, middle stage 153.3 ± 16.9 pg/mL, advanced stage 149.5 ± 36.7 pg/mL) (p = 0.0163, p = 0.0352). Concentrations of NPY in advanced stage group of KOA patients has no significant difference compare with middle stage group of KOA patients (p = 0. 2175).

Conclusions: This study demonstrated the presence and variation of concentrations of NPY in the KOA joint fluid, suggesting a role for NPY as a putative regulator of pain transmission and perception in KOA pain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of radiographic grade and concentrations of NPY of KOA patients with healthy participants. (p < 0.05: ▲ vs. Healthy control group; Intragroup KOA ★vs. Early stage group).
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Fig3: Comparison of radiographic grade and concentrations of NPY of KOA patients with healthy participants. (p < 0.05: ▲ vs. Healthy control group; Intragroup KOA ★vs. Early stage group).

Mentions: As previously stated, 100 KOA patients were divided into 3 stage groups according to Tomihisa Koshino’s scoring system: early (n = 30), middle (n = 53) and advanced (n = 17) (Figure 3).Figure 3


Levels of neuropeptide Y in synovial fluid relate to pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Wang L, Zhang L, Pan H, Peng S, Lv M, Lu WW - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Comparison of radiographic grade and concentrations of NPY of KOA patients with healthy participants. (p < 0.05: ▲ vs. Healthy control group; Intragroup KOA ★vs. Early stage group).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195915&req=5

Fig3: Comparison of radiographic grade and concentrations of NPY of KOA patients with healthy participants. (p < 0.05: ▲ vs. Healthy control group; Intragroup KOA ★vs. Early stage group).
Mentions: As previously stated, 100 KOA patients were divided into 3 stage groups according to Tomihisa Koshino’s scoring system: early (n = 30), middle (n = 53) and advanced (n = 17) (Figure 3).Figure 3

Bottom Line: Concentrations of NPY in synovial fluid were significantly higher in KOA patients (124.7 ± 33.4 pg/mL) compared with controls (64.8 ± 26.3 pg/mL) (p = 0.0297).Within the KOA group, significantly higher concentrations of NPY were found in each subgroup as pain intensified (no pain 81.4 ± 11.7 pg/mL, mild pain 99.1 ± 23.2 pg/mL, moderate pain 119.9 ± 31.5 pg/mL, strong pain 171.2 ± 37.3 pg/mL and severe pain 197.3 ± 41.9 pg/mL).Concentrations of NPY in advanced stage group of KOA patients has no significant difference compare with middle stage group of KOA patients (p = 0. 2175).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, 1068 Xueyuan Avenue, 518055 Shenzhen, China. wldzzs@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The precise etiology of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) pain remains highly controversial and there is no known effective treatment. Due to the known and suggested effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on pain, we have sought to investigate the relationship between the concentration of NPY in synovial fluid of knee, pain of KOA, and structural severity of KOA.

Methods: One hundred KOA patients and twenty healthy participants (control group) were recruited. The pain and the radiographic grade of KOA were assessed separately by Hideo Watanabe's pain score and Tomihisa Koshino's scoring system. Synovial fluid of knee from all participants was collected with arthrocentesis. Radioimmunoassay was used to examine the concentration of NPY in synovial fluid of knee.

Results: Concentrations of NPY in synovial fluid were significantly higher in KOA patients (124.7 ± 33.4 pg/mL) compared with controls (64.8 ± 26.3 pg/mL) (p = 0.0297). According to Hideo Watanabe's pain score, 100 KOA patients were divided into 5 subgroups: no pain (n = 12), mild pain (n = 25), moderate pain (n = 37), strong pain (n = 19) and severe pain (n = 7). Within the KOA group, significantly higher concentrations of NPY were found in each subgroup as pain intensified (no pain 81.4 ± 11.7 pg/mL, mild pain 99.1 ± 23.2 pg/mL, moderate pain 119.9 ± 31.5 pg/mL, strong pain 171.2 ± 37.3 pg/mL and severe pain 197.3 ± 41.9 pg/mL). Meanwhile, according to Tomihisa Koshino's scoring system, 100 KOA patients were divided into 3 subgroups: early stage (n = 30), middle stage (n = 53), advanced stage (n = 17). Concentrations of NPY in middle and advanced stage groups of KOA patients were significant higher than early stage group of KOA patients (early stage 96.4 ± 27.1 pg/mL, middle stage 153.3 ± 16.9 pg/mL, advanced stage 149.5 ± 36.7 pg/mL) (p = 0.0163, p = 0.0352). Concentrations of NPY in advanced stage group of KOA patients has no significant difference compare with middle stage group of KOA patients (p = 0. 2175).

Conclusions: This study demonstrated the presence and variation of concentrations of NPY in the KOA joint fluid, suggesting a role for NPY as a putative regulator of pain transmission and perception in KOA pain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus