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A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention.

Madigan CD, Jolly K, Lewis AL, Aveyard P, Daley AJ - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2014)

Bottom Line: The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant.Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.ISRCTN05815264.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health and Population Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. c.d.madigan@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.

Purpose: To examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.

Methods: A randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.

Results: 92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.

Conclusions: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

Trial registration: ISRCTN05815264.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of self-weighing and weight change with a line of best fit.
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Fig2: Frequency of self-weighing and weight change with a line of best fit.

Mentions: We explored if frequency of self-weighing was associated with greater weight loss in the intervention group only. We fitted regression models of weight loss on frequency of self-weighing using linear and quadratic terms but as the quadratic term did not improve the fit it was omitted. There was no evidence that frequency of self-weighing was associated with greater weight loss, with each extra day of self-weighing associated with a 20 g (95% CI -30 to +20 g greater weight loss (Figure 2).Figure 2


A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention.

Madigan CD, Jolly K, Lewis AL, Aveyard P, Daley AJ - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2014)

Frequency of self-weighing and weight change with a line of best fit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195875&req=5

Fig2: Frequency of self-weighing and weight change with a line of best fit.
Mentions: We explored if frequency of self-weighing was associated with greater weight loss in the intervention group only. We fitted regression models of weight loss on frequency of self-weighing using linear and quadratic terms but as the quadratic term did not improve the fit it was omitted. There was no evidence that frequency of self-weighing was associated with greater weight loss, with each extra day of self-weighing associated with a 20 g (95% CI -30 to +20 g greater weight loss (Figure 2).Figure 2

Bottom Line: The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant.Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.ISRCTN05815264.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health and Population Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. c.d.madigan@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.

Purpose: To examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.

Methods: A randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.

Results: 92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.

Conclusions: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

Trial registration: ISRCTN05815264.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus