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A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention.

Madigan CD, Jolly K, Lewis AL, Aveyard P, Daley AJ - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2014)

Bottom Line: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective.Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.ISRCTN05815264.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health and Population Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. c.d.madigan@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.

Purpose: To examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.

Methods: A randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.

Results: 92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.

Conclusions: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

Trial registration: ISRCTN05815264.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

CONSORT flow diagram.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: CONSORT flow diagram.

Mentions: Participants were recruited between August and November 2012. In total 355 (18.5%) patients were assessed for eligibility (Figure 1). These were comparable in age, gender and IMD to those invited to take part by the family practices. Participants in both groups were similar on all baseline characteristics, although marginally more of the intervention group reported they had a long-term health condition (54.3 vs 42.9%) (Table 2). Follow-up rates were high at three months in both groups; 92.4% intervention group and 85.7% in the control group.Figure 1


A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention.

Madigan CD, Jolly K, Lewis AL, Aveyard P, Daley AJ - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2014)

CONSORT flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195875&req=5

Fig1: CONSORT flow diagram.
Mentions: Participants were recruited between August and November 2012. In total 355 (18.5%) patients were assessed for eligibility (Figure 1). These were comparable in age, gender and IMD to those invited to take part by the family practices. Participants in both groups were similar on all baseline characteristics, although marginally more of the intervention group reported they had a long-term health condition (54.3 vs 42.9%) (Table 2). Follow-up rates were high at three months in both groups; 92.4% intervention group and 85.7% in the control group.Figure 1

Bottom Line: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective.Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.ISRCTN05815264.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health and Population Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. c.d.madigan@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.

Purpose: To examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.

Methods: A randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.

Results: 92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.

Conclusions: As an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

Trial registration: ISRCTN05815264.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus