Limits...
Idiopathic scoliosis in children and adolescents: assessment with a biplanar X-ray device.

Amzallag-Bellenger E, Uyttenhove F, Nectoux E, Moraux A, Bigot J, Herbaux B, Boutry N - Insights Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: It is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal deformity.Conventional radiography is still the modality of choice for evaluation of children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, but it requires repeat radiographs until skeletal maturity is reached and does not provide information about spinal deformity in all three planes.With its specific software, this novel vertical biplanar X-ray unit provides 3D images of the spine and offers the opportunity of visualising the spinal deformity in all three planes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Radiology, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Lille 2 University, University Hospital of Lille, Lille, France.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most common conditions encountered in paediatric practice. It is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal deformity. Conventional radiography is still the modality of choice for evaluation of children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, but it requires repeat radiographs until skeletal maturity is reached and does not provide information about spinal deformity in all three planes. A biplanar X-ray device is a new technique that enables standing frontal and lateral radiographs of the spine to be obtained at lowered radiation doses. With its specific software, this novel vertical biplanar X-ray unit provides 3D images of the spine and offers the opportunity of visualising the spinal deformity in all three planes. This pictorial review presents our experience with this new imaging system in children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis.

Key points: • The biplanar X-ray device produces two orthogonal spine X-ray images in a standing position. • The biplanar X-ray device can assess idiopathic scoliosis with a lower radiation dose. • The biplanar X-ray device provides 3D images of the spine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Surface 3D reconstructions of the spine in a 13-year-old girl with double thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. AP and lateral images (a) and corresponding surface 3D reconstructions (b) are shown. [Total DAP: 1,029 mGy·cm2]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195844&req=5

Fig10: Surface 3D reconstructions of the spine in a 13-year-old girl with double thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. AP and lateral images (a) and corresponding surface 3D reconstructions (b) are shown. [Total DAP: 1,029 mGy·cm2]

Mentions: It can be used to determine the usual spinal and pelvic radiographic parameters in both the coronal and sagittal planes (Table 1), and to assess skeletal maturity [27–34]. According to the Lenke classification system (Table 2), different types of scoliosis may be encountered (Figs. 4, 6, 7, 9 and 10). This classification takes into account the curve type in the coronal plane (structural curve versus non-structural curve[s]), its location (thoracic, lumbar or thoraco-lumbar), its flexibility, and the curves in the sagittal plane to guide surgical treatment of scoliosis [35]. Therefore, it requires standing frontal and lateral spinal radiographs as well as rightward- and leftward-bending radiographs. The latter are useful to make the distinction between the structural curve (also called the primary or the major curve) and the non-structural curves (also called secondary curves or minor curves) before surgery. The structural curve is the largest curve, the one exhibiting more vertebral rotation and the least flexible one (i.e. the one that is non-correctable or partially correctable on ipsilateral sideward-bending with a Cobb angle ≥25°) [35]. It is usually included in operative fusion. In contrast, the non-structural curves are the smallest curves, those exhibiting less vertebral rotation and the most flexible ones (i.e. the ones that are non-correctable or partially correctable on ipsilateral sideward-bending views with a Cobb angle <25°) [1].They develop secondarily, and are usually not included in operative fusion. Rightward- and leftward-bending radiographs are not currently validated in the EOS device, but they may be performed in positioning the patient off-centre within the system (Fig. 11).Table 1


Idiopathic scoliosis in children and adolescents: assessment with a biplanar X-ray device.

Amzallag-Bellenger E, Uyttenhove F, Nectoux E, Moraux A, Bigot J, Herbaux B, Boutry N - Insights Imaging (2014)

Surface 3D reconstructions of the spine in a 13-year-old girl with double thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. AP and lateral images (a) and corresponding surface 3D reconstructions (b) are shown. [Total DAP: 1,029 mGy·cm2]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195844&req=5

Fig10: Surface 3D reconstructions of the spine in a 13-year-old girl with double thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. AP and lateral images (a) and corresponding surface 3D reconstructions (b) are shown. [Total DAP: 1,029 mGy·cm2]
Mentions: It can be used to determine the usual spinal and pelvic radiographic parameters in both the coronal and sagittal planes (Table 1), and to assess skeletal maturity [27–34]. According to the Lenke classification system (Table 2), different types of scoliosis may be encountered (Figs. 4, 6, 7, 9 and 10). This classification takes into account the curve type in the coronal plane (structural curve versus non-structural curve[s]), its location (thoracic, lumbar or thoraco-lumbar), its flexibility, and the curves in the sagittal plane to guide surgical treatment of scoliosis [35]. Therefore, it requires standing frontal and lateral spinal radiographs as well as rightward- and leftward-bending radiographs. The latter are useful to make the distinction between the structural curve (also called the primary or the major curve) and the non-structural curves (also called secondary curves or minor curves) before surgery. The structural curve is the largest curve, the one exhibiting more vertebral rotation and the least flexible one (i.e. the one that is non-correctable or partially correctable on ipsilateral sideward-bending with a Cobb angle ≥25°) [35]. It is usually included in operative fusion. In contrast, the non-structural curves are the smallest curves, those exhibiting less vertebral rotation and the most flexible ones (i.e. the ones that are non-correctable or partially correctable on ipsilateral sideward-bending views with a Cobb angle <25°) [1].They develop secondarily, and are usually not included in operative fusion. Rightward- and leftward-bending radiographs are not currently validated in the EOS device, but they may be performed in positioning the patient off-centre within the system (Fig. 11).Table 1

Bottom Line: It is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal deformity.Conventional radiography is still the modality of choice for evaluation of children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, but it requires repeat radiographs until skeletal maturity is reached and does not provide information about spinal deformity in all three planes.With its specific software, this novel vertical biplanar X-ray unit provides 3D images of the spine and offers the opportunity of visualising the spinal deformity in all three planes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Radiology, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Lille 2 University, University Hospital of Lille, Lille, France.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most common conditions encountered in paediatric practice. It is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal deformity. Conventional radiography is still the modality of choice for evaluation of children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, but it requires repeat radiographs until skeletal maturity is reached and does not provide information about spinal deformity in all three planes. A biplanar X-ray device is a new technique that enables standing frontal and lateral radiographs of the spine to be obtained at lowered radiation doses. With its specific software, this novel vertical biplanar X-ray unit provides 3D images of the spine and offers the opportunity of visualising the spinal deformity in all three planes. This pictorial review presents our experience with this new imaging system in children and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis.

Key points: • The biplanar X-ray device produces two orthogonal spine X-ray images in a standing position. • The biplanar X-ray device can assess idiopathic scoliosis with a lower radiation dose. • The biplanar X-ray device provides 3D images of the spine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus