Limits...
Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 43-year-old female patient with a newly placed central venous catheter. Non-contrast CT of the upper thorax with axial reconstruction illustrates unsuccessful catheter implantation with a space-occupying lesion in the left and right chest wall (white arrows), which is partly solid, as seen with haematoma
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195842&req=5

Fig1: A 43-year-old female patient with a newly placed central venous catheter. Non-contrast CT of the upper thorax with axial reconstruction illustrates unsuccessful catheter implantation with a space-occupying lesion in the left and right chest wall (white arrows), which is partly solid, as seen with haematoma

Mentions: After implantation of the dialysis catheter, minor bleeding from the puncture point occasionally occurs, which can be treated, usually without much effort (Figs. 1 and 2).Figs. 1 and 2


Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

A 43-year-old female patient with a newly placed central venous catheter. Non-contrast CT of the upper thorax with axial reconstruction illustrates unsuccessful catheter implantation with a space-occupying lesion in the left and right chest wall (white arrows), which is partly solid, as seen with haematoma
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195842&req=5

Fig1: A 43-year-old female patient with a newly placed central venous catheter. Non-contrast CT of the upper thorax with axial reconstruction illustrates unsuccessful catheter implantation with a space-occupying lesion in the left and right chest wall (white arrows), which is partly solid, as seen with haematoma
Mentions: After implantation of the dialysis catheter, minor bleeding from the puncture point occasionally occurs, which can be treated, usually without much effort (Figs. 1 and 2).Figs. 1 and 2

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus