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Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-contrast CT of the abdomen with axial reconstruction in an 80-year-old male patient. Accumulation of contrast media administered via a peritoneal catheter is seen in the area of the straight and oblique abdominal muscles on the left side in close relationship to the entry of the catheter through the abdominal wall (white arrow) and on the right side along the oblique abdominal muscles, here probably located subfascially. The change is caused by a leak
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Fig11: Non-contrast CT of the abdomen with axial reconstruction in an 80-year-old male patient. Accumulation of contrast media administered via a peritoneal catheter is seen in the area of the straight and oblique abdominal muscles on the left side in close relationship to the entry of the catheter through the abdominal wall (white arrow) and on the right side along the oblique abdominal muscles, here probably located subfascially. The change is caused by a leak

Mentions: A dialysate leak as a complication occurs in more than 5 % of cases of dialysis patients and is commonly of no clinical significance [44]. It can occur in an early form within 30 days, whereby the etiology is usually catheter related, or in a late form after 30 days, often because of a mechanical or surgical rupture in the peritoneal membrane. With increased intra-abdominal pressure because of the dialysate, the likelihood of occurrence of a leak from the peritoneal cavity increases. Other mechanisms that increase intra-abdominal pressure, such as coughing or obesity, may also be responsible for leaks [44, 45] (Fig. 12).Fig. 12


Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

Non-contrast CT of the abdomen with axial reconstruction in an 80-year-old male patient. Accumulation of contrast media administered via a peritoneal catheter is seen in the area of the straight and oblique abdominal muscles on the left side in close relationship to the entry of the catheter through the abdominal wall (white arrow) and on the right side along the oblique abdominal muscles, here probably located subfascially. The change is caused by a leak
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195842&req=5

Fig11: Non-contrast CT of the abdomen with axial reconstruction in an 80-year-old male patient. Accumulation of contrast media administered via a peritoneal catheter is seen in the area of the straight and oblique abdominal muscles on the left side in close relationship to the entry of the catheter through the abdominal wall (white arrow) and on the right side along the oblique abdominal muscles, here probably located subfascially. The change is caused by a leak
Mentions: A dialysate leak as a complication occurs in more than 5 % of cases of dialysis patients and is commonly of no clinical significance [44]. It can occur in an early form within 30 days, whereby the etiology is usually catheter related, or in a late form after 30 days, often because of a mechanical or surgical rupture in the peritoneal membrane. With increased intra-abdominal pressure because of the dialysate, the likelihood of occurrence of a leak from the peritoneal cavity increases. Other mechanisms that increase intra-abdominal pressure, such as coughing or obesity, may also be responsible for leaks [44, 45] (Fig. 12).Fig. 12

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus