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Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

a, b. Abdominal x-ray (AP and lateral views) of this 27-year-old female patient demonstrates incorrect positioning of a peritoneal dialysis catheter in the region of the right upper abdomen (black arrow)
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Fig10: a, b. Abdominal x-ray (AP and lateral views) of this 27-year-old female patient demonstrates incorrect positioning of a peritoneal dialysis catheter in the region of the right upper abdomen (black arrow)

Mentions: Dysfunction is usually caused by the incorrect position of the central catheter. Thus, no adequate blood flow can be generated. In such cases, it is typical to attempt to reposition the catheter. If this is not possible, the implantation of a new catheter is necessary. Its tip should be in the pelvis to accomplish adequate dialysis. The volume of the dialysate drain from the catheter tip is significantly lower in the middle abdomen than in the lower abdomen. The location is usually determined by means of an x-ray (Fig. 11a, b).Fig. 11


Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.

Zandieh S, Muin D, Bernt R, Krenn-List P, Mirzaei S, Haller J - Insights Imaging (2014)

a, b. Abdominal x-ray (AP and lateral views) of this 27-year-old female patient demonstrates incorrect positioning of a peritoneal dialysis catheter in the region of the right upper abdomen (black arrow)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195842&req=5

Fig10: a, b. Abdominal x-ray (AP and lateral views) of this 27-year-old female patient demonstrates incorrect positioning of a peritoneal dialysis catheter in the region of the right upper abdomen (black arrow)
Mentions: Dysfunction is usually caused by the incorrect position of the central catheter. Thus, no adequate blood flow can be generated. In such cases, it is typical to attempt to reposition the catheter. If this is not possible, the implantation of a new catheter is necessary. Its tip should be in the pelvis to accomplish adequate dialysis. The volume of the dialysate drain from the catheter tip is significantly lower in the middle abdomen than in the lower abdomen. The location is usually determined by means of an x-ray (Fig. 11a, b).Fig. 11

Bottom Line: In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications.The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis.In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hanusch Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, EU, Austria, shahin.zandieh@chello.at.

ABSTRACT
In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus