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Functional connectivity changes in adults with developmental stuttering: a preliminary study using quantitative electro-encephalography.

Joos K, De Ridder D, Boey RA, Vanneste S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Therefore we focused on resting state brain activity and functional connectivity.Furthermore, we used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses to look at resting state activity and functional connectivity differences and their correlations with the TSS-R and OASES.PWS are characterized by decreased high frequency interhemispheric functional connectivity between motor speech, premotor and motor areas in the resting state, while higher functional connectivity in the low frequency bands indicates more severe speech disturbances, suggesting that increased interhemispheric and right sided functional connectivity is maladaptive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium ; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Stuttering is defined as speech characterized by verbal dysfluencies, but should not be seen as an isolated speech disorder, but as a generalized sensorimotor timing deficit due to impaired communication between speech related brain areas. Therefore we focused on resting state brain activity and functional connectivity.

Method: We included 11 patients with developmental stuttering and 11 age matched controls. To objectify stuttering severity and the impact on quality of life (QoL), we used the Dutch validated Test for Stuttering Severity-Readers (TSS-R) and the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), respectively. Furthermore, we used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses to look at resting state activity and functional connectivity differences and their correlations with the TSS-R and OASES.

Results: No significant results could be obtained when looking at neural activity, however significant alterations in resting state functional connectivity could be demonstrated between persons who stutter (PWS) and fluently speaking controls, predominantly interhemispheric, i.e., a decreased functional connectivity for high frequency oscillations (beta and gamma) between motor speech areas (BA44 and 45) and the contralateral premotor (BA6) and motor (BA4) areas. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between functional connectivity at low frequency oscillations (theta and alpha) and stuttering severity, while a mixed increased and decreased functional connectivity at low and high frequency oscillations correlated with QoL.

Discussion: PWS are characterized by decreased high frequency interhemispheric functional connectivity between motor speech, premotor and motor areas in the resting state, while higher functional connectivity in the low frequency bands indicates more severe speech disturbances, suggesting that increased interhemispheric and right sided functional connectivity is maladaptive.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Connectivity differences between PWS and fluently speaking controls. Decreased functional connectivity (p < 0.01) in the beta 1 frequency band (red lines), beta 3 frequency band (bleu lines) and gamma frequency band (black lines) in stuttering patients vs. fluently speaking controls.
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Figure 2: Connectivity differences between PWS and fluently speaking controls. Decreased functional connectivity (p < 0.01) in the beta 1 frequency band (red lines), beta 3 frequency band (bleu lines) and gamma frequency band (black lines) in stuttering patients vs. fluently speaking controls.

Mentions: Functional connectivity analysis between PWS and fluently speaking controls yielded a significant difference for beta 1, beta 3 and gamma band activity (t(1,20) = 2.37; p < 0.01) (Figure 2). A decreased connectivity could be observed for beta 1 between left pars triangularis (BA45) and opercularis (BA44), i.e., Broca’s areas, and right motor cortex, as well as between the right premotor area and left BA44 and the right pars opercularis and the right motor cortex. Furthermore, a significant decrease in connectivity for beta 3 could be observed between the left premotor and right BA44 and BA45. Decreased connectivity for the gamma frequency band is present between left motor and premotor cortex and right sided BA44 and BA45. No significant difference could be found for the delta, theta, alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 2 frequency band.


Functional connectivity changes in adults with developmental stuttering: a preliminary study using quantitative electro-encephalography.

Joos K, De Ridder D, Boey RA, Vanneste S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Connectivity differences between PWS and fluently speaking controls. Decreased functional connectivity (p < 0.01) in the beta 1 frequency band (red lines), beta 3 frequency band (bleu lines) and gamma frequency band (black lines) in stuttering patients vs. fluently speaking controls.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195313&req=5

Figure 2: Connectivity differences between PWS and fluently speaking controls. Decreased functional connectivity (p < 0.01) in the beta 1 frequency band (red lines), beta 3 frequency band (bleu lines) and gamma frequency band (black lines) in stuttering patients vs. fluently speaking controls.
Mentions: Functional connectivity analysis between PWS and fluently speaking controls yielded a significant difference for beta 1, beta 3 and gamma band activity (t(1,20) = 2.37; p < 0.01) (Figure 2). A decreased connectivity could be observed for beta 1 between left pars triangularis (BA45) and opercularis (BA44), i.e., Broca’s areas, and right motor cortex, as well as between the right premotor area and left BA44 and the right pars opercularis and the right motor cortex. Furthermore, a significant decrease in connectivity for beta 3 could be observed between the left premotor and right BA44 and BA45. Decreased connectivity for the gamma frequency band is present between left motor and premotor cortex and right sided BA44 and BA45. No significant difference could be found for the delta, theta, alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 2 frequency band.

Bottom Line: Therefore we focused on resting state brain activity and functional connectivity.Furthermore, we used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses to look at resting state activity and functional connectivity differences and their correlations with the TSS-R and OASES.PWS are characterized by decreased high frequency interhemispheric functional connectivity between motor speech, premotor and motor areas in the resting state, while higher functional connectivity in the low frequency bands indicates more severe speech disturbances, suggesting that increased interhemispheric and right sided functional connectivity is maladaptive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium ; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Stuttering is defined as speech characterized by verbal dysfluencies, but should not be seen as an isolated speech disorder, but as a generalized sensorimotor timing deficit due to impaired communication between speech related brain areas. Therefore we focused on resting state brain activity and functional connectivity.

Method: We included 11 patients with developmental stuttering and 11 age matched controls. To objectify stuttering severity and the impact on quality of life (QoL), we used the Dutch validated Test for Stuttering Severity-Readers (TSS-R) and the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), respectively. Furthermore, we used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses to look at resting state activity and functional connectivity differences and their correlations with the TSS-R and OASES.

Results: No significant results could be obtained when looking at neural activity, however significant alterations in resting state functional connectivity could be demonstrated between persons who stutter (PWS) and fluently speaking controls, predominantly interhemispheric, i.e., a decreased functional connectivity for high frequency oscillations (beta and gamma) between motor speech areas (BA44 and 45) and the contralateral premotor (BA6) and motor (BA4) areas. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between functional connectivity at low frequency oscillations (theta and alpha) and stuttering severity, while a mixed increased and decreased functional connectivity at low and high frequency oscillations correlated with QoL.

Discussion: PWS are characterized by decreased high frequency interhemispheric functional connectivity between motor speech, premotor and motor areas in the resting state, while higher functional connectivity in the low frequency bands indicates more severe speech disturbances, suggesting that increased interhemispheric and right sided functional connectivity is maladaptive.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus