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Cases of atypical lymphangiomas in children.

Minocha PK, Roop L, Persad R - Case Rep Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: They are most frequently found in the neck and axilla, while intra-abdominal and mediastinal lymphangiomas are uncommon.Conclusion.We believe that ultrasound scan is very good at detection of the lesion, while CT is better at determining tumour content and planning for the operation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Surgery, San Fernando General Hospital, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago.

ABSTRACT
Background. Lymphatic malformations or lymphangiomas are rare benign hamartomas that result from maldevelopment of primitive lymphatic sacs. They are most frequently found in the neck and axilla, while intra-abdominal and mediastinal lymphangiomas are uncommon. These are primarily tumours of infancy and childhood and are successfully treated with surgical excision. Summary of Cases. Five cases of lymphangioma comprising three intra-abdominal lymphangiomas and two unilateral axillary lymphangiomas presenting at one institution in Trinidad W.I. between 2005 and 2012 were examined. The presentations, location, workup, treatment, and outcome of these patients were studied. Conclusion. This paper discusses a range of extracervical lymphangioma cases seen at San Fernando General Hospital, Trinidad W.I. We report three intra-abdominal cases and the most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and distension. Also two axillary cases were reported, which presented as painless axillary masses. The major concerns for excision of axillary lymphangioma by parents and surgeons were cosmesis and feasibility of complete resection without disruption of developing breast tissue and axillary vessels. We believe that ultrasound scan is very good at detection of the lesion, while CT is better at determining tumour content and planning for the operation. It is our opinion that complete surgical excision can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT of the chest showing an 8 cm × 7 cm × 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall.
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fig9: CT of the chest showing an 8 cm × 7 cm × 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall.

Mentions: This male patient was referred to us at birth with a right chest swelling (Figure 7). USS of the chest revealed a predominantly cystic mass with septations in the right lateral chest wall near the right axilla, 5 cm by 4 cm (Figure 8). Differential diagnoses included axillary lymphangioma and unilateral gynaecomastia and he was scheduled for regular follow-up at our outpatient clinic. The patient had no medical problems and no significant family history. Monthly follow-up revealed that the mass was progressively decreasing in size. However at one-year follow-up, mother noticed an increase in size with the mass measuring 6 cm by 5 cm on physical examination. The patient was scheduled for elective surgical excision pending CT scan. Chest CT with contrast revealed 8 cm by 7 cm by 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall abutting the pectoralis major muscle (Figure 9). Surgical excision performed at 14 months showed 7 cm by 7 cm cystic mass in the right axilla. The surgical site healed well and follow-up with USS for the past 2 years has been uneventful thus far. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma.


Cases of atypical lymphangiomas in children.

Minocha PK, Roop L, Persad R - Case Rep Pediatr (2014)

CT of the chest showing an 8 cm × 7 cm × 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195264&req=5

fig9: CT of the chest showing an 8 cm × 7 cm × 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall.
Mentions: This male patient was referred to us at birth with a right chest swelling (Figure 7). USS of the chest revealed a predominantly cystic mass with septations in the right lateral chest wall near the right axilla, 5 cm by 4 cm (Figure 8). Differential diagnoses included axillary lymphangioma and unilateral gynaecomastia and he was scheduled for regular follow-up at our outpatient clinic. The patient had no medical problems and no significant family history. Monthly follow-up revealed that the mass was progressively decreasing in size. However at one-year follow-up, mother noticed an increase in size with the mass measuring 6 cm by 5 cm on physical examination. The patient was scheduled for elective surgical excision pending CT scan. Chest CT with contrast revealed 8 cm by 7 cm by 3 cm enhancing mixed density mass in the right chest wall abutting the pectoralis major muscle (Figure 9). Surgical excision performed at 14 months showed 7 cm by 7 cm cystic mass in the right axilla. The surgical site healed well and follow-up with USS for the past 2 years has been uneventful thus far. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma.

Bottom Line: They are most frequently found in the neck and axilla, while intra-abdominal and mediastinal lymphangiomas are uncommon.Conclusion.We believe that ultrasound scan is very good at detection of the lesion, while CT is better at determining tumour content and planning for the operation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Surgery, San Fernando General Hospital, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago.

ABSTRACT
Background. Lymphatic malformations or lymphangiomas are rare benign hamartomas that result from maldevelopment of primitive lymphatic sacs. They are most frequently found in the neck and axilla, while intra-abdominal and mediastinal lymphangiomas are uncommon. These are primarily tumours of infancy and childhood and are successfully treated with surgical excision. Summary of Cases. Five cases of lymphangioma comprising three intra-abdominal lymphangiomas and two unilateral axillary lymphangiomas presenting at one institution in Trinidad W.I. between 2005 and 2012 were examined. The presentations, location, workup, treatment, and outcome of these patients were studied. Conclusion. This paper discusses a range of extracervical lymphangioma cases seen at San Fernando General Hospital, Trinidad W.I. We report three intra-abdominal cases and the most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and distension. Also two axillary cases were reported, which presented as painless axillary masses. The major concerns for excision of axillary lymphangioma by parents and surgeons were cosmesis and feasibility of complete resection without disruption of developing breast tissue and axillary vessels. We believe that ultrasound scan is very good at detection of the lesion, while CT is better at determining tumour content and planning for the operation. It is our opinion that complete surgical excision can be achieved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus