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Improving state Medicaid programs for pregnant women and children.

Hill IT - Health Care Financ Rev (1990)

Bottom Line: Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority.Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans.Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Governors' Association, Washington, DC 20001.

ABSTRACT
Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority. As progress on important maternal and infant health indicators has slowed and/or worsened. States have taken advantage of numerous Federal Medicaid options to implement innovative strategies to enhance low-income women's access to prenatal care and to improve the content of that care. Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans. Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

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Medicaid enhanced prenatal benefit programs: July 1990
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f2-hcfr-90-supp-075: Medicaid enhanced prenatal benefit programs: July 1990

Mentions: Improving the health status of low-income mothers and their children requires more than expanding financial access to care. Significant reduction in America's rates of infant mortality and low birth weight can be achieved only if serious attention also is paid to the content and quality of care rendered to women. When reviewing recent initiatives to reform public perinatal systems, it quickly becomes clear that these facts have not been lost on State policymakers. Indeed, momentum created by State expansions of eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level has also generated numerous comprehensive reforms of services and service delivery systems for pregnant women. As of July 1990, 35 States have implemented broad new programs of enhanced prenatal care services financed through Medicaid (Figure 2).


Improving state Medicaid programs for pregnant women and children.

Hill IT - Health Care Financ Rev (1990)

Medicaid enhanced prenatal benefit programs: July 1990
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195155&req=5

f2-hcfr-90-supp-075: Medicaid enhanced prenatal benefit programs: July 1990
Mentions: Improving the health status of low-income mothers and their children requires more than expanding financial access to care. Significant reduction in America's rates of infant mortality and low birth weight can be achieved only if serious attention also is paid to the content and quality of care rendered to women. When reviewing recent initiatives to reform public perinatal systems, it quickly becomes clear that these facts have not been lost on State policymakers. Indeed, momentum created by State expansions of eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level has also generated numerous comprehensive reforms of services and service delivery systems for pregnant women. As of July 1990, 35 States have implemented broad new programs of enhanced prenatal care services financed through Medicaid (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority.Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans.Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Governors' Association, Washington, DC 20001.

ABSTRACT
Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority. As progress on important maternal and infant health indicators has slowed and/or worsened. States have taken advantage of numerous Federal Medicaid options to implement innovative strategies to enhance low-income women's access to prenatal care and to improve the content of that care. Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans. Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

Show MeSH