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Improving state Medicaid programs for pregnant women and children.

Hill IT - Health Care Financ Rev (1990)

Bottom Line: Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority.Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans.Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Governors' Association, Washington, DC 20001.

ABSTRACT
Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority. As progress on important maternal and infant health indicators has slowed and/or worsened. States have taken advantage of numerous Federal Medicaid options to implement innovative strategies to enhance low-income women's access to prenatal care and to improve the content of that care. Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans. Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

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States broadening Medicaid eligibility for poverty-related coverage of pregnant women and children: July 1990
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f1-hcfr-90-supp-075: States broadening Medicaid eligibility for poverty-related coverage of pregnant women and children: July 1990

Mentions: The impact of OBRA 1989 was felt more widely by States. Thirty-two States did not have thresholds at 133 percent of the poverty level for pregnant women and infants and were required to adjust incrementally, most from 100 percent to 133 percent. A much larger effect surrounded the mandated expanded coverage of children, however. Only 14 States were already covering children to 6 or 7 years of age in April 1989. Twenty-five States were phasing-in coverage of children from 2-5 years of age, and 12 States covered only infants to 1 year of age under the special expanded coverage group. All were brought into compliance with the minimum floor of age 6 as of April 1990 (National Governors' Association, 1990) (Figure 1 and Table 1).


Improving state Medicaid programs for pregnant women and children.

Hill IT - Health Care Financ Rev (1990)

States broadening Medicaid eligibility for poverty-related coverage of pregnant women and children: July 1990
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195155&req=5

f1-hcfr-90-supp-075: States broadening Medicaid eligibility for poverty-related coverage of pregnant women and children: July 1990
Mentions: The impact of OBRA 1989 was felt more widely by States. Thirty-two States did not have thresholds at 133 percent of the poverty level for pregnant women and infants and were required to adjust incrementally, most from 100 percent to 133 percent. A much larger effect surrounded the mandated expanded coverage of children, however. Only 14 States were already covering children to 6 or 7 years of age in April 1989. Twenty-five States were phasing-in coverage of children from 2-5 years of age, and 12 States covered only infants to 1 year of age under the special expanded coverage group. All were brought into compliance with the minimum floor of age 6 as of April 1990 (National Governors' Association, 1990) (Figure 1 and Table 1).

Bottom Line: Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority.Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans.Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Governors' Association, Washington, DC 20001.

ABSTRACT
Beginning in 1986, States have made the reduction of infant mortality a major policy priority. As progress on important maternal and infant health indicators has slowed and/or worsened. States have taken advantage of numerous Federal Medicaid options to implement innovative strategies to enhance low-income women's access to prenatal care and to improve the content of that care. Acting initially to expand Medicaid eligibility up to and above the Federal poverty level, States have moved to further improve programs by streamlining eligibility systems, enhancing outreach initiatives, attempting to recruit obstetrical providers into participating in Medicaid, and adding enriched nonmedical prenatal benefits to their State plans. Although policymakers must await formal evaluation results, State reforms appear encouraging.

Show MeSH