Limits...
Containing U.S. health care costs: What bullet to bite?

Jencks SF, Schieber GJ - Health Care Financ Rev (1992)

Bottom Line: In this article, the authors provide an overview of the problem of health care cost containment.Further, the authors define cost containment, provide a framework for describing cost-containment strategies, and describe the major cost-containment strategies.Finally, the role of research in choosing such a strategy for the United States is examined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In this article, the authors provide an overview of the problem of health care cost containment. Both the growth of health care spending and its underlying causes are discussed. Further, the authors define cost containment, provide a framework for describing cost-containment strategies, and describe the major cost-containment strategies. Finally, the role of research in choosing such a strategy for the United States is examined.

No MeSH data available.


Relative growth index in nominal Medicare health expenditures: United States, 1970-90 (semi-logarithmic scale)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195141&req=5

f2-hcfr-91-supp-001: Relative growth index in nominal Medicare health expenditures: United States, 1970-90 (semi-logarithmic scale)

Mentions: Because much of the current cost-containment debate has focused on Medicare, an analysis of the expenditure trends in the Medicare program is useful. Figure 2 shows, for the Medicare program, the same information as Figure 1 (excluding prescription drugs). Over the 20-year period, Medicare expenditures increased at an annual rate of 14.3 percent, significantly faster than the rate of 11.6 percent for all health spending and 8.7 percent for GDP. As a result, Medicare spending increased from 0.8 percent of GDP in 1970 to 2.1 percent in 1990, and from 10.3 percent of all health care spending in 1970 to 16.7 percent in 1990. About 2-3 percentage points of this growth is the result of growth in the number of enrollees, aging of the enrolled population, and coverage of the disabled and those with end stage renal disease. We do not know if the remainder of Medicare's substantially higher rate of spending growth results from more generous payment rates for medical care providers, supplemental insurance that reduces demand restraints, new and expensive technologies being differentially used for Medicare enrollees, or more liberal benefits and coverage rules relative to other payers.


Containing U.S. health care costs: What bullet to bite?

Jencks SF, Schieber GJ - Health Care Financ Rev (1992)

Relative growth index in nominal Medicare health expenditures: United States, 1970-90 (semi-logarithmic scale)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195141&req=5

f2-hcfr-91-supp-001: Relative growth index in nominal Medicare health expenditures: United States, 1970-90 (semi-logarithmic scale)
Mentions: Because much of the current cost-containment debate has focused on Medicare, an analysis of the expenditure trends in the Medicare program is useful. Figure 2 shows, for the Medicare program, the same information as Figure 1 (excluding prescription drugs). Over the 20-year period, Medicare expenditures increased at an annual rate of 14.3 percent, significantly faster than the rate of 11.6 percent for all health spending and 8.7 percent for GDP. As a result, Medicare spending increased from 0.8 percent of GDP in 1970 to 2.1 percent in 1990, and from 10.3 percent of all health care spending in 1970 to 16.7 percent in 1990. About 2-3 percentage points of this growth is the result of growth in the number of enrollees, aging of the enrolled population, and coverage of the disabled and those with end stage renal disease. We do not know if the remainder of Medicare's substantially higher rate of spending growth results from more generous payment rates for medical care providers, supplemental insurance that reduces demand restraints, new and expensive technologies being differentially used for Medicare enrollees, or more liberal benefits and coverage rules relative to other payers.

Bottom Line: In this article, the authors provide an overview of the problem of health care cost containment.Further, the authors define cost containment, provide a framework for describing cost-containment strategies, and describe the major cost-containment strategies.Finally, the role of research in choosing such a strategy for the United States is examined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In this article, the authors provide an overview of the problem of health care cost containment. Both the growth of health care spending and its underlying causes are discussed. Further, the authors define cost containment, provide a framework for describing cost-containment strategies, and describe the major cost-containment strategies. Finally, the role of research in choosing such a strategy for the United States is examined.

No MeSH data available.