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Medicaid waiver personal care services: results of a statewide survey.

Glass AP, Roberto KA, Brossoie N, Teaster PB, Butler DQ - Health Care Financ Rev (2008)

Bottom Line: Through a statewide telephone survey of 819 beneficiaries (or their proxies), we collected data regarding client and aide demographics, as well as clients' satisfaction, outcomes, perspectives on staff performance, and complaints associated with home-based personal care services provided under the Virginia Medicaid Elderly and Disabled (E&D) waiver.Most respondents indicated that services improved their lives, and they were generally satisfied.Ongoing use of client/family caregiver surveys is warranted to allow continued monitoring of service provision.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-5775, USA. aglass@geron.uga.edu

ABSTRACT
Through a statewide telephone survey of 819 beneficiaries (or their proxies), we collected data regarding client and aide demographics, as well as clients' satisfaction, outcomes, perspectives on staff performance, and complaints associated with home-based personal care services provided under the Virginia Medicaid Elderly and Disabled (E&D) waiver. Most respondents indicated that services improved their lives, and they were generally satisfied. Opportunities for improvement exist, however, especially related to the amount of time spent with the client, the need for training, and communication issues. Ongoing use of client/family caregiver surveys is warranted to allow continued monitoring of service provision.

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Model of Home and Community-Based Services Quality
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f1-hcfr-30-02-053: Model of Home and Community-Based Services Quality

Mentions: From that phase, eight key dimensions emerged. Quality is enhanced when the aide: (1) is honest and trustworthy; (2) reliably appears on the assigned days, at the assigned times, and stays the full time allotted; (3) comes well trained with an appropriate knowledge base; (4) focuses energy on the client; (5) is consistent; (6) uses methods suiting the client; (7) is easy to have around; and (8) communicates effectively. These dimensions correlate with Noelker and Harel's (2000) model of HCBS quality (Figure 1) that we have reported earlier (Glass et al., 2005). This model was used in developing our survey, and we ensured that all eight dimensions were reflected by representative variables. We included a few items that overlap with work by Geron and colleagues (2000) (e.g., the aide knows what to do), but our framework and the information we collected guided our selection and wording of questions as we developed the instrument. Our focus was solely on personal care, and we used this opportunity to gain a broader understanding of the care process, including some items for research purposes only, and to test the broader statewide applicability of the original study.


Medicaid waiver personal care services: results of a statewide survey.

Glass AP, Roberto KA, Brossoie N, Teaster PB, Butler DQ - Health Care Financ Rev (2008)

Model of Home and Community-Based Services Quality
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4195057&req=5

f1-hcfr-30-02-053: Model of Home and Community-Based Services Quality
Mentions: From that phase, eight key dimensions emerged. Quality is enhanced when the aide: (1) is honest and trustworthy; (2) reliably appears on the assigned days, at the assigned times, and stays the full time allotted; (3) comes well trained with an appropriate knowledge base; (4) focuses energy on the client; (5) is consistent; (6) uses methods suiting the client; (7) is easy to have around; and (8) communicates effectively. These dimensions correlate with Noelker and Harel's (2000) model of HCBS quality (Figure 1) that we have reported earlier (Glass et al., 2005). This model was used in developing our survey, and we ensured that all eight dimensions were reflected by representative variables. We included a few items that overlap with work by Geron and colleagues (2000) (e.g., the aide knows what to do), but our framework and the information we collected guided our selection and wording of questions as we developed the instrument. Our focus was solely on personal care, and we used this opportunity to gain a broader understanding of the care process, including some items for research purposes only, and to test the broader statewide applicability of the original study.

Bottom Line: Through a statewide telephone survey of 819 beneficiaries (or their proxies), we collected data regarding client and aide demographics, as well as clients' satisfaction, outcomes, perspectives on staff performance, and complaints associated with home-based personal care services provided under the Virginia Medicaid Elderly and Disabled (E&D) waiver.Most respondents indicated that services improved their lives, and they were generally satisfied.Ongoing use of client/family caregiver surveys is warranted to allow continued monitoring of service provision.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-5775, USA. aglass@geron.uga.edu

ABSTRACT
Through a statewide telephone survey of 819 beneficiaries (or their proxies), we collected data regarding client and aide demographics, as well as clients' satisfaction, outcomes, perspectives on staff performance, and complaints associated with home-based personal care services provided under the Virginia Medicaid Elderly and Disabled (E&D) waiver. Most respondents indicated that services improved their lives, and they were generally satisfied. Opportunities for improvement exist, however, especially related to the amount of time spent with the client, the need for training, and communication issues. Ongoing use of client/family caregiver surveys is warranted to allow continued monitoring of service provision.

Show MeSH