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Medicaid's expenditures for newer pharmacotherapies for adults with disabilities.

Shireman TI, Hall JP, Rigler SK, Moore JM - Health Care Financ Rev (2007)

Bottom Line: These prescription drug costs are important contributors to increasing health care costs for disabled persons.We analyzed Kansas Medicaid data to describe trends in medication use patterns across 3 years among disabled beneficiaries.The marked shifts toward newer medications and disproportionate contributions of newer, more expensive medications to overall prescription costs for antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antiulcer medications, anti-inflammatory agents, and opioids have implications for both policy and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Kansas, Medical Center, Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, KS 66160, USA. tshireman@kumc.edu

ABSTRACT
Medicaid's drug expenditures have grown at double-digit inflation rates since 2000. These prescription drug costs are important contributors to increasing health care costs for disabled persons. In spite of this knowledge, little has been reported about specific patterns of medication use among disabled enrollees. We analyzed Kansas Medicaid data to describe trends in medication use patterns across 3 years among disabled beneficiaries. The marked shifts toward newer medications and disproportionate contributions of newer, more expensive medications to overall prescription costs for antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antiulcer medications, anti-inflammatory agents, and opioids have implications for both policy and practice.

Show MeSH
Market Shares as Percent of Prescriptions and Expenditures for Newer Agents in Major Therapeutic Classes Used in the Kansas Medicaid Disabled Program: 2001-2002
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194999&req=5

f1-hcfr-28-4-031: Market Shares as Percent of Prescriptions and Expenditures for Newer Agents in Major Therapeutic Classes Used in the Kansas Medicaid Disabled Program: 2001-2002

Mentions: In all classes, newer agents accounted for a higher percent of expenditures than the percentage of prescriptions as shown in Figure 1. (Additional information is available on request from the author.) Antibiotics and antidiabetic agents saw the least change in the relative composition of newer and older agents. For all other groups, newer medications contributed disproportionately to expenditures. For instance, newer anti-inflammatory agents accounted for 35 percent of the prescriptions in the class in the first period, but 54 percent of the expenditures. They grew to 52 percent of the prescriptions and 74 percent of the expenditures by the third period. Long-acting opioid use grew only slightly from 9 to 11-12 percent of prescriptions, but accounted for a marked increase in the proportion of expenditures (increasing from 43 to 64 percent). Newer antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anti-ulcer medications comprised over 70 percent of prescriptions and over 90 percent of expenditures in their respective markets. Newer anticonvulsants grew from 18 to 28 percent of prescriptions accompanied by a change from 37 to 53 percent of expenditures.


Medicaid's expenditures for newer pharmacotherapies for adults with disabilities.

Shireman TI, Hall JP, Rigler SK, Moore JM - Health Care Financ Rev (2007)

Market Shares as Percent of Prescriptions and Expenditures for Newer Agents in Major Therapeutic Classes Used in the Kansas Medicaid Disabled Program: 2001-2002
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194999&req=5

f1-hcfr-28-4-031: Market Shares as Percent of Prescriptions and Expenditures for Newer Agents in Major Therapeutic Classes Used in the Kansas Medicaid Disabled Program: 2001-2002
Mentions: In all classes, newer agents accounted for a higher percent of expenditures than the percentage of prescriptions as shown in Figure 1. (Additional information is available on request from the author.) Antibiotics and antidiabetic agents saw the least change in the relative composition of newer and older agents. For all other groups, newer medications contributed disproportionately to expenditures. For instance, newer anti-inflammatory agents accounted for 35 percent of the prescriptions in the class in the first period, but 54 percent of the expenditures. They grew to 52 percent of the prescriptions and 74 percent of the expenditures by the third period. Long-acting opioid use grew only slightly from 9 to 11-12 percent of prescriptions, but accounted for a marked increase in the proportion of expenditures (increasing from 43 to 64 percent). Newer antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anti-ulcer medications comprised over 70 percent of prescriptions and over 90 percent of expenditures in their respective markets. Newer anticonvulsants grew from 18 to 28 percent of prescriptions accompanied by a change from 37 to 53 percent of expenditures.

Bottom Line: These prescription drug costs are important contributors to increasing health care costs for disabled persons.We analyzed Kansas Medicaid data to describe trends in medication use patterns across 3 years among disabled beneficiaries.The marked shifts toward newer medications and disproportionate contributions of newer, more expensive medications to overall prescription costs for antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antiulcer medications, anti-inflammatory agents, and opioids have implications for both policy and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Kansas, Medical Center, Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, KS 66160, USA. tshireman@kumc.edu

ABSTRACT
Medicaid's drug expenditures have grown at double-digit inflation rates since 2000. These prescription drug costs are important contributors to increasing health care costs for disabled persons. In spite of this knowledge, little has been reported about specific patterns of medication use among disabled enrollees. We analyzed Kansas Medicaid data to describe trends in medication use patterns across 3 years among disabled beneficiaries. The marked shifts toward newer medications and disproportionate contributions of newer, more expensive medications to overall prescription costs for antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antiulcer medications, anti-inflammatory agents, and opioids have implications for both policy and practice.

Show MeSH