Limits...
Disabled Medicare beneficiaries by dual eligible status: California, 1996-2001.

O'Leary JE, Sloss EM, Melnick G - Health Care Financ Rev (2007)

Bottom Line: Disabled dually eligible beneficiaries experienced consistently higher hospitalization rates and average length of stay (LOS) than nondually eligible beneficiaries from 1996 to 2001.Inpatient days remain higher among dually eligible beneficiaries when stratified by the system of care, age, sex, or race.In addition, the hospitalization rate of disabled dually eligible beneficiaries was higher for most diagnoses, but how much higher varied by condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California, USA. oleary@rand.org

ABSTRACT
This highlight describes the characteristics and inpatient utilization of under age 65 disabled California Medicare beneficiaries by dual eligible status (i.e., Medicaid State buy-in coverage or not). More disabled dually eligible beneficiaries are younger, non-White, and in fee-for-service (FFS) than non-dually eligible beneficiaries. Disabled dually eligible beneficiaries experienced consistently higher hospitalization rates and average length of stay (LOS) than nondually eligible beneficiaries from 1996 to 2001. Inpatient days remain higher among dually eligible beneficiaries when stratified by the system of care, age, sex, or race. In addition, the hospitalization rate of disabled dually eligible beneficiaries was higher for most diagnoses, but how much higher varied by condition.

Show MeSH
Mean Inpatient Days, by Age for Disabled Dually and Non-Dually Eligible Medicare Beneficiaries: California, 2001
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194998&req=5

f7-hcfr-28-4-057: Mean Inpatient Days, by Age for Disabled Dually and Non-Dually Eligible Medicare Beneficiaries: California, 2001

Mentions: The mean inpatient days for the two groups by FFS and HMO enrollment in 2001 is shown in Figure 6. Within FFS, dually eligible beneficiaries have 57 percent more inpatient days when compared to non-dually eligible beneficiaries (1,939 versus 1,231 per 1,000). Among those belonging to an HMO, dually eligible beneficiaries still have 30 percent more inpatient days than non-dually eligible beneficiaries (1,543 versus 1,190 days per 1,000), but fewer inpatient days than FFS. Figure 7 shows inpatient days increase with age, especially for dually eligible beneficiaries (1,344 for beneficiaries age 18-44, 2,086 for age 45-54, and 2,686 for age 55-63). Female and male dually eligible beneficiaries have 58 and 54 percent more inpatient days, respectively, than their counterparts (Figure 8). Figure 9 shows when stratified by race, dually eligible beneficiaries have consistently more inpatient days than non-dually eligible beneficiaries with the difference being greatest for those classified as Black (2,383 versus 1,200 days per 1,000, respectively). Table 1 presents a comparison of the discharge rate by MDC for the two groups. Overall, the discharge rate among dually eligible beneficiaries is 26 percent higher than their counterparts. The discharge rate of dually eligible beneficiaries is greater than that of their counterparts for all but three of the MDCs. For three MDCs (human immunodeficiency virus infections, burns, and mental diseases and disorders), the discharge rate of dually eligible beneficiaries is more than twice that of non-dually eligible beneficiaries. However, despite these large differentials between the two groups, the numbers of discharges on which these three rates are based are relatively small.


Disabled Medicare beneficiaries by dual eligible status: California, 1996-2001.

O'Leary JE, Sloss EM, Melnick G - Health Care Financ Rev (2007)

Mean Inpatient Days, by Age for Disabled Dually and Non-Dually Eligible Medicare Beneficiaries: California, 2001
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194998&req=5

f7-hcfr-28-4-057: Mean Inpatient Days, by Age for Disabled Dually and Non-Dually Eligible Medicare Beneficiaries: California, 2001
Mentions: The mean inpatient days for the two groups by FFS and HMO enrollment in 2001 is shown in Figure 6. Within FFS, dually eligible beneficiaries have 57 percent more inpatient days when compared to non-dually eligible beneficiaries (1,939 versus 1,231 per 1,000). Among those belonging to an HMO, dually eligible beneficiaries still have 30 percent more inpatient days than non-dually eligible beneficiaries (1,543 versus 1,190 days per 1,000), but fewer inpatient days than FFS. Figure 7 shows inpatient days increase with age, especially for dually eligible beneficiaries (1,344 for beneficiaries age 18-44, 2,086 for age 45-54, and 2,686 for age 55-63). Female and male dually eligible beneficiaries have 58 and 54 percent more inpatient days, respectively, than their counterparts (Figure 8). Figure 9 shows when stratified by race, dually eligible beneficiaries have consistently more inpatient days than non-dually eligible beneficiaries with the difference being greatest for those classified as Black (2,383 versus 1,200 days per 1,000, respectively). Table 1 presents a comparison of the discharge rate by MDC for the two groups. Overall, the discharge rate among dually eligible beneficiaries is 26 percent higher than their counterparts. The discharge rate of dually eligible beneficiaries is greater than that of their counterparts for all but three of the MDCs. For three MDCs (human immunodeficiency virus infections, burns, and mental diseases and disorders), the discharge rate of dually eligible beneficiaries is more than twice that of non-dually eligible beneficiaries. However, despite these large differentials between the two groups, the numbers of discharges on which these three rates are based are relatively small.

Bottom Line: Disabled dually eligible beneficiaries experienced consistently higher hospitalization rates and average length of stay (LOS) than nondually eligible beneficiaries from 1996 to 2001.Inpatient days remain higher among dually eligible beneficiaries when stratified by the system of care, age, sex, or race.In addition, the hospitalization rate of disabled dually eligible beneficiaries was higher for most diagnoses, but how much higher varied by condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California, USA. oleary@rand.org

ABSTRACT
This highlight describes the characteristics and inpatient utilization of under age 65 disabled California Medicare beneficiaries by dual eligible status (i.e., Medicaid State buy-in coverage or not). More disabled dually eligible beneficiaries are younger, non-White, and in fee-for-service (FFS) than non-dually eligible beneficiaries. Disabled dually eligible beneficiaries experienced consistently higher hospitalization rates and average length of stay (LOS) than nondually eligible beneficiaries from 1996 to 2001. Inpatient days remain higher among dually eligible beneficiaries when stratified by the system of care, age, sex, or race. In addition, the hospitalization rate of disabled dually eligible beneficiaries was higher for most diagnoses, but how much higher varied by condition.

Show MeSH