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Improved estimates of capital formation in the National Health Expenditure Accounts.

Sensenig AL, Donahoe GF - Health Care Financ Rev (2006)

Bottom Line: The largest revision was the incorporation of a more comprehensive measure of investment in medical sector capital.The revision raised total health expenditures' share of gross domestic product (GDP) from 15.4 to 15.8 percent in 2003.The improved measure encompasses investment in moveable equipment and software, as well as expenditures for the construction of structures used by the medical sector.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA. Arthur.Sensenig@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) were revised with the release of the 2004 estimates. The largest revision was the incorporation of a more comprehensive measure of investment in medical sector capital. The revision raised total health expenditures' share of gross domestic product (GDP) from 15.4 to 15.8 percent in 2003. The improved measure encompasses investment in moveable equipment and software, as well as expenditures for the construction of structures used by the medical sector.

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Estimates of Investment in Medical Structures: Calendar Years 1960-2004
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f2-hcfr-28-1-009: Estimates of Investment in Medical Structures: Calendar Years 1960-2004

Mentions: The revised estimates of investment in medical sector capital for 1960 to 2004 were introduced in the NHEA estimates released in January 2006 (Smith et al., 2006).7 These estimates of are presented in Table 4. The redefinition of medical sector structures and the addition of medical sector capital equipment, and software increased total NHE by $51.4 billion in 2003. The 2003 estimates of investment in structures (previously titled construction) were revised upward by $7.1 billion (Figure 2). The addition of estimates of investment in capital, equipment, and software used by the medical sector increased total NHE by an additional $44.3 billion. The impact of the revisions on total NHE varies over time.


Improved estimates of capital formation in the National Health Expenditure Accounts.

Sensenig AL, Donahoe GF - Health Care Financ Rev (2006)

Estimates of Investment in Medical Structures: Calendar Years 1960-2004
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194967&req=5

f2-hcfr-28-1-009: Estimates of Investment in Medical Structures: Calendar Years 1960-2004
Mentions: The revised estimates of investment in medical sector capital for 1960 to 2004 were introduced in the NHEA estimates released in January 2006 (Smith et al., 2006).7 These estimates of are presented in Table 4. The redefinition of medical sector structures and the addition of medical sector capital equipment, and software increased total NHE by $51.4 billion in 2003. The 2003 estimates of investment in structures (previously titled construction) were revised upward by $7.1 billion (Figure 2). The addition of estimates of investment in capital, equipment, and software used by the medical sector increased total NHE by an additional $44.3 billion. The impact of the revisions on total NHE varies over time.

Bottom Line: The largest revision was the incorporation of a more comprehensive measure of investment in medical sector capital.The revision raised total health expenditures' share of gross domestic product (GDP) from 15.4 to 15.8 percent in 2003.The improved measure encompasses investment in moveable equipment and software, as well as expenditures for the construction of structures used by the medical sector.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA. Arthur.Sensenig@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) were revised with the release of the 2004 estimates. The largest revision was the incorporation of a more comprehensive measure of investment in medical sector capital. The revision raised total health expenditures' share of gross domestic product (GDP) from 15.4 to 15.8 percent in 2003. The improved measure encompasses investment in moveable equipment and software, as well as expenditures for the construction of structures used by the medical sector.

Show MeSH