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HMO penetration, hospital competition, and growth of ambulatory surgery centers.

Bian J, Morrisey MA - Health Care Financ Rev (2006)

Bottom Line: Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs).Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population.A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama, Birmingham 35294, USA. jbian@uab.edu

ABSTRACT
Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population. A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population.

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Growth of Ambulatory Service Centers (ASCs) in Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 1992-2001
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f1-hcfr-27-4-111: Growth of Ambulatory Service Centers (ASCs) in Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 1992-2001

Mentions: Table 1 shows the total number of ASCs in MSAs growth rate from 1,156 in 1992 to 2,916 in 2001, whereas the corresponding number of ASCs in MSAs reported by the 2002 OSCAR grew from 1,173 to 2,967 (Figure 1). Thus, our data captured almost all operating ASCs in MSAs in 2001. The number of ASCs per 10,000 population increased at a similar rate from 0.07 to 0.17 during the same period. (Twenty of the 317 MSAs had no ASC during the study period.)


HMO penetration, hospital competition, and growth of ambulatory surgery centers.

Bian J, Morrisey MA - Health Care Financ Rev (2006)

Growth of Ambulatory Service Centers (ASCs) in Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 1992-2001
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194957&req=5

f1-hcfr-27-4-111: Growth of Ambulatory Service Centers (ASCs) in Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 1992-2001
Mentions: Table 1 shows the total number of ASCs in MSAs growth rate from 1,156 in 1992 to 2,916 in 2001, whereas the corresponding number of ASCs in MSAs reported by the 2002 OSCAR grew from 1,173 to 2,967 (Figure 1). Thus, our data captured almost all operating ASCs in MSAs in 2001. The number of ASCs per 10,000 population increased at a similar rate from 0.07 to 0.17 during the same period. (Twenty of the 317 MSAs had no ASC during the study period.)

Bottom Line: Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs).Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population.A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama, Birmingham 35294, USA. jbian@uab.edu

ABSTRACT
Using metropolitan statistical area (MSA) panel data from 1992-2001 constructed from the 2002 Medicare Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System, we estimate the market effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration and hospital competition on the growth of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Our regression models with MSA and year fixed effects suggest that a 10-percentage-point increase in HMO penetration is associated with a decrease of 3 ASCs per 1 million population. A decrease from 5 to 4 equal-market-shared hospitals in a market is associated with an increase of 2.5 ASCs per 1 million population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus