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Multiple cohorts analysis of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey, 1998-2002.

Grace SC, Shannon ED, Drachman D, Ellis BH - Health Care Financ Rev (2005)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Services Advisory Group.

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National surveys such as the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provide an opportunity to examine changes in the physical and mental health of Medicare beneficiaries over time... The current study is based on results from the HOS... Beneficiaries from the baseline sample are surveyed again 2 years later (the followup data collection)... For the survey results on which this study is based, the HOS includes the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND SF-36), which yields two distinct higher order measures of health status: the physical component summary (PCS) score and the mental component summary (MCS) score... Because a beneficiary may have been surveyed multiple times during the administration of the HOS, observation of mean changes in PCS and MCS scores over differing time intervals is possible... A completed survey was defined as having a calculable PCS and MCS score using 1998 norm-based standard scoring... For beneficiaries who completed five surveys in a row, the mean PCS scores are 44.16, 43.26, 42.20, 41.50, and 40.22, and the mean changes for successive years are -0.90, -1.06, -0.70, and -1.28, respectively... Mean changes for successive years are -0.48, -0.26, +0.10, and -0.54, respectively... A similar pattern of results was also observed for the beneficiaries completing four consecutive surveys, the beneficiaries completing three consecutive surveys, and the beneficiaries completing two consecutive surveys (Figures 1 and 2)... Significance tests were also conducted for 4 years (PCS linear contrast, F = 421.72, p < 0.0001; quadratic and cubic contrasts not significant and MCS linear contrast, F = 44.43, p < 0.0001; quadratic and cubic contrasts not significant) as well as 3 years (PCS linear contrast, F = 480.03, p < 0.0001; quadratic contrast not significant, and MCS linear contrast, F = 54.57, p < 0.0001; quadratic contrast not significant)... These results confirm that both PCS and MCS scores decline at a constant rate from year to year... However, for the beneficiaries who responded to consecutive surveys, this longitudinal analysis reveals that PCS and MCS scores decline at a constant rate over periods as long as 5 years... Therefore, the current HOS administrative procedure of following up on respondents after a 2-year interval appears to be sufficient for accurately documenting rates of health decline... Intervals longer than 2 years would likely result in more beneficiaries lost through attrition and therefore smaller sample sizes.

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Mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) Scores of Beneficiaries (Age 65 or Over) Who Completed 2, 3, 4, or 5 Consecutive Surveys: 1998-2002
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f2-hcfr-26-3-125: Mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) Scores of Beneficiaries (Age 65 or Over) Who Completed 2, 3, 4, or 5 Consecutive Surveys: 1998-2002

Mentions: For beneficiaries who completed five surveys in a row, the mean PCS scores are 44.16, 43.26, 42.20, 41.50, and 40.22, and the mean changes for successive years are -0.90, -1.06, -0.70, and -1.28, respectively. MCS scores indicate a similar pattern; however, the decline is smaller than for PCS scores. Mean changes for successive years are -0.48, -0.26, +0.10, and -0.54, respectively. A similar pattern of results was also observed for the beneficiaries completing four consecutive surveys, the beneficiaries completing three consecutive surveys, and the beneficiaries completing two consecutive surveys (Figures 1 and 2).


Multiple cohorts analysis of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey, 1998-2002.

Grace SC, Shannon ED, Drachman D, Ellis BH - Health Care Financ Rev (2005)

Mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) Scores of Beneficiaries (Age 65 or Over) Who Completed 2, 3, 4, or 5 Consecutive Surveys: 1998-2002
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194931&req=5

f2-hcfr-26-3-125: Mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) Scores of Beneficiaries (Age 65 or Over) Who Completed 2, 3, 4, or 5 Consecutive Surveys: 1998-2002
Mentions: For beneficiaries who completed five surveys in a row, the mean PCS scores are 44.16, 43.26, 42.20, 41.50, and 40.22, and the mean changes for successive years are -0.90, -1.06, -0.70, and -1.28, respectively. MCS scores indicate a similar pattern; however, the decline is smaller than for PCS scores. Mean changes for successive years are -0.48, -0.26, +0.10, and -0.54, respectively. A similar pattern of results was also observed for the beneficiaries completing four consecutive surveys, the beneficiaries completing three consecutive surveys, and the beneficiaries completing two consecutive surveys (Figures 1 and 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Services Advisory Group.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

National surveys such as the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provide an opportunity to examine changes in the physical and mental health of Medicare beneficiaries over time... The current study is based on results from the HOS... Beneficiaries from the baseline sample are surveyed again 2 years later (the followup data collection)... For the survey results on which this study is based, the HOS includes the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND SF-36), which yields two distinct higher order measures of health status: the physical component summary (PCS) score and the mental component summary (MCS) score... Because a beneficiary may have been surveyed multiple times during the administration of the HOS, observation of mean changes in PCS and MCS scores over differing time intervals is possible... A completed survey was defined as having a calculable PCS and MCS score using 1998 norm-based standard scoring... For beneficiaries who completed five surveys in a row, the mean PCS scores are 44.16, 43.26, 42.20, 41.50, and 40.22, and the mean changes for successive years are -0.90, -1.06, -0.70, and -1.28, respectively... Mean changes for successive years are -0.48, -0.26, +0.10, and -0.54, respectively... A similar pattern of results was also observed for the beneficiaries completing four consecutive surveys, the beneficiaries completing three consecutive surveys, and the beneficiaries completing two consecutive surveys (Figures 1 and 2)... Significance tests were also conducted for 4 years (PCS linear contrast, F = 421.72, p < 0.0001; quadratic and cubic contrasts not significant and MCS linear contrast, F = 44.43, p < 0.0001; quadratic and cubic contrasts not significant) as well as 3 years (PCS linear contrast, F = 480.03, p < 0.0001; quadratic contrast not significant, and MCS linear contrast, F = 54.57, p < 0.0001; quadratic contrast not significant)... These results confirm that both PCS and MCS scores decline at a constant rate from year to year... However, for the beneficiaries who responded to consecutive surveys, this longitudinal analysis reveals that PCS and MCS scores decline at a constant rate over periods as long as 5 years... Therefore, the current HOS administrative procedure of following up on respondents after a 2-year interval appears to be sufficient for accurately documenting rates of health decline... Intervals longer than 2 years would likely result in more beneficiaries lost through attrition and therefore smaller sample sizes.

Show MeSH