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National health expenditures, 2002.

Cowan C, Catlin A, Smith C, Sensenig A - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001.For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP.Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA.

ABSTRACT
National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001. For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP. Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

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Average Annual Growth in Per Enrollee Medicare and PHI Common Benefits1: Selected Years 1969-20021 Common benefits include hospital, physician, clinic and other professional service plus durable medical products.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary, National Health Statistics Group, 2004.We compare spending only for benefits provided by both Medicare and PHI (hospital, physician, clinical and other professional services, plus durable medical products). From 1969-2002, Medicare per enrollee spending has grown at a slightly slower average annual rate than PHI, with more pronounced differences in growth occurring after 1983.Between 1970 and 1983, average annual per-enrollee growth rates for these benefits were similar. Since September 1983 when Medicare implemented the first PPS for inpatient hospital services—with the exception of the 1993-1997 period when growth in managed care dominated the PHI market—per enrollee costs, on average, for these common services in Medicare have grown more slowly than in PHI.Between 1999 and 2002, Medicare per-enrollee spending grew 6.2 percent for these benefits compared to PHI per-enrollee growth of 8.7 percent. During this period, Medicare spending responded to a series of policy changes aimed at better managing public funds while private health insurers responded to consumer demands for more costly, less tightly managed plans.
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f8-hcfr-25-4-143: Average Annual Growth in Per Enrollee Medicare and PHI Common Benefits1: Selected Years 1969-20021 Common benefits include hospital, physician, clinic and other professional service plus durable medical products.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary, National Health Statistics Group, 2004.We compare spending only for benefits provided by both Medicare and PHI (hospital, physician, clinical and other professional services, plus durable medical products). From 1969-2002, Medicare per enrollee spending has grown at a slightly slower average annual rate than PHI, with more pronounced differences in growth occurring after 1983.Between 1970 and 1983, average annual per-enrollee growth rates for these benefits were similar. Since September 1983 when Medicare implemented the first PPS for inpatient hospital services—with the exception of the 1993-1997 period when growth in managed care dominated the PHI market—per enrollee costs, on average, for these common services in Medicare have grown more slowly than in PHI.Between 1999 and 2002, Medicare per-enrollee spending grew 6.2 percent for these benefits compared to PHI per-enrollee growth of 8.7 percent. During this period, Medicare spending responded to a series of policy changes aimed at better managing public funds while private health insurers responded to consumer demands for more costly, less tightly managed plans.


National health expenditures, 2002.

Cowan C, Catlin A, Smith C, Sensenig A - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Average Annual Growth in Per Enrollee Medicare and PHI Common Benefits1: Selected Years 1969-20021 Common benefits include hospital, physician, clinic and other professional service plus durable medical products.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary, National Health Statistics Group, 2004.We compare spending only for benefits provided by both Medicare and PHI (hospital, physician, clinical and other professional services, plus durable medical products). From 1969-2002, Medicare per enrollee spending has grown at a slightly slower average annual rate than PHI, with more pronounced differences in growth occurring after 1983.Between 1970 and 1983, average annual per-enrollee growth rates for these benefits were similar. Since September 1983 when Medicare implemented the first PPS for inpatient hospital services—with the exception of the 1993-1997 period when growth in managed care dominated the PHI market—per enrollee costs, on average, for these common services in Medicare have grown more slowly than in PHI.Between 1999 and 2002, Medicare per-enrollee spending grew 6.2 percent for these benefits compared to PHI per-enrollee growth of 8.7 percent. During this period, Medicare spending responded to a series of policy changes aimed at better managing public funds while private health insurers responded to consumer demands for more costly, less tightly managed plans.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194892&req=5

f8-hcfr-25-4-143: Average Annual Growth in Per Enrollee Medicare and PHI Common Benefits1: Selected Years 1969-20021 Common benefits include hospital, physician, clinic and other professional service plus durable medical products.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary, National Health Statistics Group, 2004.We compare spending only for benefits provided by both Medicare and PHI (hospital, physician, clinical and other professional services, plus durable medical products). From 1969-2002, Medicare per enrollee spending has grown at a slightly slower average annual rate than PHI, with more pronounced differences in growth occurring after 1983.Between 1970 and 1983, average annual per-enrollee growth rates for these benefits were similar. Since September 1983 when Medicare implemented the first PPS for inpatient hospital services—with the exception of the 1993-1997 period when growth in managed care dominated the PHI market—per enrollee costs, on average, for these common services in Medicare have grown more slowly than in PHI.Between 1999 and 2002, Medicare per-enrollee spending grew 6.2 percent for these benefits compared to PHI per-enrollee growth of 8.7 percent. During this period, Medicare spending responded to a series of policy changes aimed at better managing public funds while private health insurers responded to consumer demands for more costly, less tightly managed plans.
Bottom Line: National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001.For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP.Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA.

ABSTRACT
National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001. For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP. Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

Show MeSH