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National health expenditures, 2002.

Cowan C, Catlin A, Smith C, Sensenig A - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001.For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP.Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA.

ABSTRACT
National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001. For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP. Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

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Growth in Medicare Enrollment and Expenditures: Selected Years 1990-2002Aggregate spending for health care on behalf of Medicare's 39.6 million enrollees reached $267 billion in 2002, 8.4 percent higher than spending in 2001.Average annual growth in total Medicare enrollment gradually slowed from 1.7 percent from 1990-1997 to 0.9 percent from 1997-1999, but increased slightly to 1.1 percent from 1999-2002.BBA contributed to a rapid deceleration in FFS spending growth from 1997-1999, followed by a rebound as the provisions of BBRA and BIPA were implemented.Changes introduced by the BBA in the managed care payment formula caused a decline in the number of plans participating in Medicare, reducing managed care enrollment and producing a decline in managed care expenditures from 1999-2002.
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f6-hcfr-25-4-143: Growth in Medicare Enrollment and Expenditures: Selected Years 1990-2002Aggregate spending for health care on behalf of Medicare's 39.6 million enrollees reached $267 billion in 2002, 8.4 percent higher than spending in 2001.Average annual growth in total Medicare enrollment gradually slowed from 1.7 percent from 1990-1997 to 0.9 percent from 1997-1999, but increased slightly to 1.1 percent from 1999-2002.BBA contributed to a rapid deceleration in FFS spending growth from 1997-1999, followed by a rebound as the provisions of BBRA and BIPA were implemented.Changes introduced by the BBA in the managed care payment formula caused a decline in the number of plans participating in Medicare, reducing managed care enrollment and producing a decline in managed care expenditures from 1999-2002.


National health expenditures, 2002.

Cowan C, Catlin A, Smith C, Sensenig A - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Growth in Medicare Enrollment and Expenditures: Selected Years 1990-2002Aggregate spending for health care on behalf of Medicare's 39.6 million enrollees reached $267 billion in 2002, 8.4 percent higher than spending in 2001.Average annual growth in total Medicare enrollment gradually slowed from 1.7 percent from 1990-1997 to 0.9 percent from 1997-1999, but increased slightly to 1.1 percent from 1999-2002.BBA contributed to a rapid deceleration in FFS spending growth from 1997-1999, followed by a rebound as the provisions of BBRA and BIPA were implemented.Changes introduced by the BBA in the managed care payment formula caused a decline in the number of plans participating in Medicare, reducing managed care enrollment and producing a decline in managed care expenditures from 1999-2002.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194892&req=5

f6-hcfr-25-4-143: Growth in Medicare Enrollment and Expenditures: Selected Years 1990-2002Aggregate spending for health care on behalf of Medicare's 39.6 million enrollees reached $267 billion in 2002, 8.4 percent higher than spending in 2001.Average annual growth in total Medicare enrollment gradually slowed from 1.7 percent from 1990-1997 to 0.9 percent from 1997-1999, but increased slightly to 1.1 percent from 1999-2002.BBA contributed to a rapid deceleration in FFS spending growth from 1997-1999, followed by a rebound as the provisions of BBRA and BIPA were implemented.Changes introduced by the BBA in the managed care payment formula caused a decline in the number of plans participating in Medicare, reducing managed care enrollment and producing a decline in managed care expenditures from 1999-2002.
Bottom Line: National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001.For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP.Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of the Actuary, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Baltimore, MD 21244-1850, USA.

ABSTRACT
National health expenditures (NHE) were $1.6 trillion in 2002, a 9.3-percent increase from 2001. For the fourth consecutive year health spending grew faster than the overall economy as measured by the GDP. Growth in U.S. health care spending rose for most health services in 2002, with hospital spending once again the primary driver

Show MeSH