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Provider Opt-Out Under Medicare Private Contracting.

Buczko W - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: This article examines the number and characteristics of providers who have opted-out, their role in the provision of Part B services, and their impact on beneficiary access from 1998 to 2002.Opt-out providers differ from providers remaining in Medicare with respect to specialty, practice characteristics, and Medicare Program activity.Very few providers found opting-out attractive and the departure of this small group of providers appears not to have created access problems for beneficiaries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA) permits private contracting for care between Medicare beneficiaries and providers who have opted out of Medicare. This article examines the number and characteristics of providers who have opted-out, their role in the provision of Part B services, and their impact on beneficiary access from 1998 to 2002. Opt-out providers differ from providers remaining in Medicare with respect to specialty, practice characteristics, and Medicare Program activity. Very few providers found opting-out attractive and the departure of this small group of providers appears not to have created access problems for beneficiaries.

No MeSH data available.


Total Number of Providers Opting Out, by Year: 1998-2002
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f1-hcfr-26-2-043: Total Number of Providers Opting Out, by Year: 1998-2002

Mentions: From 1998 to 2002, 2,839 physicians, clinical psychologists, and other providers chose to opt-out. This represents 0.42 percent of the physicians and other providers eligible to opt out under the 1997 BBA This low percentage may reflect the limited knowledge among physicians concerning opting-out, as MedPAC's 1999 physician survey indicated (Schoenman and Chang, 1999). Figure 1 shows the total number of providers opting-out by year, along with the cumulative total of providers opting out. Growth in the ranks of providers electing private contracting has been uneven over time. These data indicate that the greatest number of opt-outs (721) occurred during 2002 surpassing the 710 providers who opted out during 1998, the first year of the provision.


Provider Opt-Out Under Medicare Private Contracting.

Buczko W - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Total Number of Providers Opting Out, by Year: 1998-2002
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194870&req=5

f1-hcfr-26-2-043: Total Number of Providers Opting Out, by Year: 1998-2002
Mentions: From 1998 to 2002, 2,839 physicians, clinical psychologists, and other providers chose to opt-out. This represents 0.42 percent of the physicians and other providers eligible to opt out under the 1997 BBA This low percentage may reflect the limited knowledge among physicians concerning opting-out, as MedPAC's 1999 physician survey indicated (Schoenman and Chang, 1999). Figure 1 shows the total number of providers opting-out by year, along with the cumulative total of providers opting out. Growth in the ranks of providers electing private contracting has been uneven over time. These data indicate that the greatest number of opt-outs (721) occurred during 2002 surpassing the 710 providers who opted out during 1998, the first year of the provision.

Bottom Line: This article examines the number and characteristics of providers who have opted-out, their role in the provision of Part B services, and their impact on beneficiary access from 1998 to 2002.Opt-out providers differ from providers remaining in Medicare with respect to specialty, practice characteristics, and Medicare Program activity.Very few providers found opting-out attractive and the departure of this small group of providers appears not to have created access problems for beneficiaries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA) permits private contracting for care between Medicare beneficiaries and providers who have opted out of Medicare. This article examines the number and characteristics of providers who have opted-out, their role in the provision of Part B services, and their impact on beneficiary access from 1998 to 2002. Opt-out providers differ from providers remaining in Medicare with respect to specialty, practice characteristics, and Medicare Program activity. Very few providers found opting-out attractive and the departure of this small group of providers appears not to have created access problems for beneficiaries.

No MeSH data available.