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Medicaid prescription drug spending in the 1990s: a decade of change.

Baugh DK, Pine PL, Blackwell S, Ciborowski G - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent.Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase.By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, C3-20-17, Baltimore, MD 21244, USA. dbaugh@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
Medicaid spending increased dramatically during the 1990s, driven in part by spending for prescription drugs. From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent. Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase. By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending. These findings provide information on drug spending for dually eligible beneficiaries to policymakers as they seek to target cost-effective coverage and drug therapies.

Show MeSH
Medicaid Prescription Drug Payments, All Beneficiaries, by Drug Category: CY1997
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194863&req=5

f7-hcfr-25-3-005: Medicaid Prescription Drug Payments, All Beneficiaries, by Drug Category: CY1997

Mentions: Figure 7 presents Medicaid prescription drug payments for the SMRF States, by therapeutic category. Among the 17 categories, the highest spending, by category, was for CNS drugs. This category includes anxiolytics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and hypnotics. In 1997, CNS drugs represented nearly $1.16 billion or greater than 17 percent of total Medicaid spending for prescription drugs in the 29 States. The second highest spending level was for cardiovascular agents (which include calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, and ACE inhibitors) at $982 million (14.7 percent). Cardiovascular agents were followed by anti-infective agents at $835 million (12.5 percent) and gastrointestinal agents at $785 million (11.8 percent). A large proportion of total drug spending (over 56 percent) was concentrated in these four categories. The five categories with the lowest spending levels (miscellaneous psychotherapeutic and neurological agents, stimulants/anti-obesity/anorexiants, genitourinary products, antineoplastic agents, and biologicals) accounted for only 4 percent of total prescription drug spending. However, spending levels differed by eligibility group. The highest spending level for disabled beneficiaries was for CNS drugs. For the aged, cardiovascular agents accounted for the highest amount. For children and adults, the highest spending level was for anti-infective agents (data not shown).


Medicaid prescription drug spending in the 1990s: a decade of change.

Baugh DK, Pine PL, Blackwell S, Ciborowski G - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Medicaid Prescription Drug Payments, All Beneficiaries, by Drug Category: CY1997
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194863&req=5

f7-hcfr-25-3-005: Medicaid Prescription Drug Payments, All Beneficiaries, by Drug Category: CY1997
Mentions: Figure 7 presents Medicaid prescription drug payments for the SMRF States, by therapeutic category. Among the 17 categories, the highest spending, by category, was for CNS drugs. This category includes anxiolytics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and hypnotics. In 1997, CNS drugs represented nearly $1.16 billion or greater than 17 percent of total Medicaid spending for prescription drugs in the 29 States. The second highest spending level was for cardiovascular agents (which include calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, and ACE inhibitors) at $982 million (14.7 percent). Cardiovascular agents were followed by anti-infective agents at $835 million (12.5 percent) and gastrointestinal agents at $785 million (11.8 percent). A large proportion of total drug spending (over 56 percent) was concentrated in these four categories. The five categories with the lowest spending levels (miscellaneous psychotherapeutic and neurological agents, stimulants/anti-obesity/anorexiants, genitourinary products, antineoplastic agents, and biologicals) accounted for only 4 percent of total prescription drug spending. However, spending levels differed by eligibility group. The highest spending level for disabled beneficiaries was for CNS drugs. For the aged, cardiovascular agents accounted for the highest amount. For children and adults, the highest spending level was for anti-infective agents (data not shown).

Bottom Line: From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent.Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase.By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, C3-20-17, Baltimore, MD 21244, USA. dbaugh@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
Medicaid spending increased dramatically during the 1990s, driven in part by spending for prescription drugs. From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent. Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase. By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending. These findings provide information on drug spending for dually eligible beneficiaries to policymakers as they seek to target cost-effective coverage and drug therapies.

Show MeSH