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Medicaid prescription drug spending in the 1990s: a decade of change.

Baugh DK, Pine PL, Blackwell S, Ciborowski G - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent.Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase.By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, C3-20-17, Baltimore, MD 21244, USA. dbaugh@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
Medicaid spending increased dramatically during the 1990s, driven in part by spending for prescription drugs. From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent. Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase. By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending. These findings provide information on drug spending for dually eligible beneficiaries to policymakers as they seek to target cost-effective coverage and drug therapies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Medicaid Prescription Drug Payment per Dual Recipient1, by Selected Beneficiary Characteristics2: Federal FY 19981 Medicaid prescription drug payment per recipient is defined to be Medicaid payments for prescription drugs divided by the number of Medicaid enrollees who received at least one covered prescription drug during the FY. A consistent approach has been taken to define the numerator and denominator of this statistic. A Medicaid enrollee is represented in the payment amount (in the numerator) and as a prescription drug recipient (in the denominator) if and only if there was a FFS claim for a prescription drug for that person. Dual recipients are those Medicaid eligibles who were also eligible to receive Medicare benefits.2 These data are reported for Medicaid beneficiaries who were also enrolled in Medicare (otherwise known as dually eligible enrollees). Beneficiaries were identified as residing in a metropolitan or non-metropolitan area based on their county of residence.NOTE: For FY 1998, participation in MSIS was voluntary. Of the 38 States that participated, there were consistent data for 35 States to produce these statistics.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Data from the Medicaid Statistical Information System, 2003.
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f6-hcfr-25-3-005: Medicaid Prescription Drug Payment per Dual Recipient1, by Selected Beneficiary Characteristics2: Federal FY 19981 Medicaid prescription drug payment per recipient is defined to be Medicaid payments for prescription drugs divided by the number of Medicaid enrollees who received at least one covered prescription drug during the FY. A consistent approach has been taken to define the numerator and denominator of this statistic. A Medicaid enrollee is represented in the payment amount (in the numerator) and as a prescription drug recipient (in the denominator) if and only if there was a FFS claim for a prescription drug for that person. Dual recipients are those Medicaid eligibles who were also eligible to receive Medicare benefits.2 These data are reported for Medicaid beneficiaries who were also enrolled in Medicare (otherwise known as dually eligible enrollees). Beneficiaries were identified as residing in a metropolitan or non-metropolitan area based on their county of residence.NOTE: For FY 1998, participation in MSIS was voluntary. Of the 38 States that participated, there were consistent data for 35 States to produce these statistics.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Data from the Medicaid Statistical Information System, 2003.

Mentions: Because of the ongoing interest in the cost of drugs for Medicare beneficiaries, analysis of FY 1998 data for dually eligible beneficiaries was performed. Medicaid prescription drug payments per recipient are presented by selected demographic characteristics for dually aged and disabled beneficiaries (Figure 6). There was no substantial variation in payment amounts among aged beneficiaries, by sex and age group, except that there was a slight decline in payments for persons age 85 or over. Similarly, payment per recipient for dually disabled beneficiaries residing in non-metropolitan areas was comparable to that of aged beneficiaries. However, payment per recipient for both male and female disabled beneficiaries in metropolitan areas was much higher than for that of the other groups.


Medicaid prescription drug spending in the 1990s: a decade of change.

Baugh DK, Pine PL, Blackwell S, Ciborowski G - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Medicaid Prescription Drug Payment per Dual Recipient1, by Selected Beneficiary Characteristics2: Federal FY 19981 Medicaid prescription drug payment per recipient is defined to be Medicaid payments for prescription drugs divided by the number of Medicaid enrollees who received at least one covered prescription drug during the FY. A consistent approach has been taken to define the numerator and denominator of this statistic. A Medicaid enrollee is represented in the payment amount (in the numerator) and as a prescription drug recipient (in the denominator) if and only if there was a FFS claim for a prescription drug for that person. Dual recipients are those Medicaid eligibles who were also eligible to receive Medicare benefits.2 These data are reported for Medicaid beneficiaries who were also enrolled in Medicare (otherwise known as dually eligible enrollees). Beneficiaries were identified as residing in a metropolitan or non-metropolitan area based on their county of residence.NOTE: For FY 1998, participation in MSIS was voluntary. Of the 38 States that participated, there were consistent data for 35 States to produce these statistics.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Data from the Medicaid Statistical Information System, 2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194863&req=5

f6-hcfr-25-3-005: Medicaid Prescription Drug Payment per Dual Recipient1, by Selected Beneficiary Characteristics2: Federal FY 19981 Medicaid prescription drug payment per recipient is defined to be Medicaid payments for prescription drugs divided by the number of Medicaid enrollees who received at least one covered prescription drug during the FY. A consistent approach has been taken to define the numerator and denominator of this statistic. A Medicaid enrollee is represented in the payment amount (in the numerator) and as a prescription drug recipient (in the denominator) if and only if there was a FFS claim for a prescription drug for that person. Dual recipients are those Medicaid eligibles who were also eligible to receive Medicare benefits.2 These data are reported for Medicaid beneficiaries who were also enrolled in Medicare (otherwise known as dually eligible enrollees). Beneficiaries were identified as residing in a metropolitan or non-metropolitan area based on their county of residence.NOTE: For FY 1998, participation in MSIS was voluntary. Of the 38 States that participated, there were consistent data for 35 States to produce these statistics.SOURCE: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Data from the Medicaid Statistical Information System, 2003.
Mentions: Because of the ongoing interest in the cost of drugs for Medicare beneficiaries, analysis of FY 1998 data for dually eligible beneficiaries was performed. Medicaid prescription drug payments per recipient are presented by selected demographic characteristics for dually aged and disabled beneficiaries (Figure 6). There was no substantial variation in payment amounts among aged beneficiaries, by sex and age group, except that there was a slight decline in payments for persons age 85 or over. Similarly, payment per recipient for dually disabled beneficiaries residing in non-metropolitan areas was comparable to that of aged beneficiaries. However, payment per recipient for both male and female disabled beneficiaries in metropolitan areas was much higher than for that of the other groups.

Bottom Line: From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent.Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase.By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, C3-20-17, Baltimore, MD 21244, USA. dbaugh@cms.hhs.gov

ABSTRACT
Medicaid spending increased dramatically during the 1990s, driven in part by spending for prescription drugs. From 1990 to 2000, Medicaid drug spending increased from $4.4 billion to over $20 billion, an average annual increase of 16.3 percent. Disabled persons experienced an even greater 20 percent average annual increase. By drug category in 1997 (for 29 States), the highest spending amount was for central nervous system (CNS) drugs, accounting for 17 percent of total Medicaid drug spending. These findings provide information on drug spending for dually eligible beneficiaries to policymakers as they seek to target cost-effective coverage and drug therapies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus