Limits...
Drug policy down under: Australia's pharmaceutical benefits scheme.

Duckett SJ - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Bottom Line: The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) consumes around 14 percent of total government health care expenditures and has grown substantially in both range of drugs covered, and expenditure since it was first introduced in 1950.It incorporates patient copayments (with differentials for the general population compared with concessional beneficiaries).Prior to listing a drug on the PBS it is subject to a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. sduckett@latrobe.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Australia has had a government subsidized universal system of pharmaceutical provision for 50 years. The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) consumes around 14 percent of total government health care expenditures and has grown substantially in both range of drugs covered, and expenditure since it was first introduced in 1950. It incorporates patient copayments (with differentials for the general population compared with concessional beneficiaries). Prior to listing a drug on the PBS it is subject to a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis.

Show MeSH
Trends in Expenditures for Australia's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme: 1948-1949 to 2001-2002
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194861&req=5

f1-hcfr-25-3-055: Trends in Expenditures for Australia's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme: 1948-1949 to 2001-2002

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the growth in pharmaceutical benefits expenditure since the inception of PBS. Expenditure on pharmaceutical benefits has increased exponentially since the beginning of the program, with particularly rapid growth in expenditure on drugs used by pensioners and concessional cardholders. More importantly, 73 percent of government pharmaceutical benefits prescription expenditure is for pensioners, severely limiting the ability of government to curtail expenditure using the strategy of shifting costs to consumers. People age 65 or over have a 50-percent higher prescription rate than those under age 45. This high percentage of use for pensioners should not be surprising because the elderly generally have poorer health status than younger persons and have higher hospital utilization rates.


Drug policy down under: Australia's pharmaceutical benefits scheme.

Duckett SJ - Health Care Financ Rev (2004)

Trends in Expenditures for Australia's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme: 1948-1949 to 2001-2002
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194861&req=5

f1-hcfr-25-3-055: Trends in Expenditures for Australia's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme: 1948-1949 to 2001-2002
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the growth in pharmaceutical benefits expenditure since the inception of PBS. Expenditure on pharmaceutical benefits has increased exponentially since the beginning of the program, with particularly rapid growth in expenditure on drugs used by pensioners and concessional cardholders. More importantly, 73 percent of government pharmaceutical benefits prescription expenditure is for pensioners, severely limiting the ability of government to curtail expenditure using the strategy of shifting costs to consumers. People age 65 or over have a 50-percent higher prescription rate than those under age 45. This high percentage of use for pensioners should not be surprising because the elderly generally have poorer health status than younger persons and have higher hospital utilization rates.

Bottom Line: The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) consumes around 14 percent of total government health care expenditures and has grown substantially in both range of drugs covered, and expenditure since it was first introduced in 1950.It incorporates patient copayments (with differentials for the general population compared with concessional beneficiaries).Prior to listing a drug on the PBS it is subject to a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. sduckett@latrobe.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Australia has had a government subsidized universal system of pharmaceutical provision for 50 years. The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) consumes around 14 percent of total government health care expenditures and has grown substantially in both range of drugs covered, and expenditure since it was first introduced in 1950. It incorporates patient copayments (with differentials for the general population compared with concessional beneficiaries). Prior to listing a drug on the PBS it is subject to a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis.

Show MeSH