Limits...
Near visual acuity in an inner city Hispanic community: understanding the barriers and benefits of correction.

Wubben T, Wolfe G, Guerrero C, Korcz WJ, Ramsey DJ - Community Eye Health (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MSc/PhD student, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA. twubben1983@yahoo.com.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Few studies have examined the burden of presbyopia in the United States of America (USA), and none have examined it in economically disadvantaged or minority populations, in which there are increased rates of visual impairment and decreased use of eye care services., In our study, individuals ≥35 years of age who attended an employment fair sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Services (IDES) in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago were invited to undergo testing of their near vision and to befitted with reading spectacles, if needed... After receiving reading spectacles, 80% achieved a near acuity of ≥20/25 (6/7.5)... Uncorrected near acuity <20/50 (6/15) was associated with greater difficulty reading print (p<0.02) and perceived worse eyesight (p<0.0001) compared to those with uncorrected near visual acuity of ≥20/50... More than 98 per cent of respondents stated they could read... An improved ability to read was cited as the most important benefit of reading spectacles, with minimal impact perceived on other daily tasks (Table 1)... Those who stated that reading spectacles would impact the task of reading print only to some degree or not at all were younger (50±6 years versus 56±9 years: p<0.01) and had better uncorrected near visual acuity (>6/12 versus <6/15: p<0.05)... Similar associations were observed between uncorrected near vision and the perceived impact of reading spectacles on other tasks such as preparing meals, using hand tools or sewing, as well as grooming, shaving, or applying makeup... Neither employment status nor gender had a statistically significant impact on the perceived benefits of reading spectacles... Considering that a store selling reading spectacles for US $1 was located next to the IDES office, this distribution of responses most likely reflects a lack of knowledge about the condition and its readily accessible treatment... Many people who require near vision correction can benefit from ready-made or ‘over-the-counter’ reading spectacles... Considering that the rates of blindness and visual impairment in these groups is significantly greater than that of non-Hispanic whites, this amounts to suboptimal use of eye care services relative to the recommended guidelines for high-risk groups from the American Academy of Ophthalmology... In a country where services are readily available and spectacles are affordable, nearly half of the participants were not aware that this was case... All of the participants would have benefited from a pair of reading spectacles... Health care providers should also be educated about the increased rates of blindness and visual impairment in the African American and Hispanic populations so that they can encourage and refer individuals in these population groups for regularly scheduled eye examinations.

No MeSH data available.


Pilsen neighborhood, Chicago, IL
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194855&req=5

Figure 1: Pilsen neighborhood, Chicago, IL


Near visual acuity in an inner city Hispanic community: understanding the barriers and benefits of correction.

Wubben T, Wolfe G, Guerrero C, Korcz WJ, Ramsey DJ - Community Eye Health (2014)

Pilsen neighborhood, Chicago, IL
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194855&req=5

Figure 1: Pilsen neighborhood, Chicago, IL

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MSc/PhD student, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA. twubben1983@yahoo.com.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Few studies have examined the burden of presbyopia in the United States of America (USA), and none have examined it in economically disadvantaged or minority populations, in which there are increased rates of visual impairment and decreased use of eye care services., In our study, individuals ≥35 years of age who attended an employment fair sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Services (IDES) in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago were invited to undergo testing of their near vision and to befitted with reading spectacles, if needed... After receiving reading spectacles, 80% achieved a near acuity of ≥20/25 (6/7.5)... Uncorrected near acuity <20/50 (6/15) was associated with greater difficulty reading print (p<0.02) and perceived worse eyesight (p<0.0001) compared to those with uncorrected near visual acuity of ≥20/50... More than 98 per cent of respondents stated they could read... An improved ability to read was cited as the most important benefit of reading spectacles, with minimal impact perceived on other daily tasks (Table 1)... Those who stated that reading spectacles would impact the task of reading print only to some degree or not at all were younger (50±6 years versus 56±9 years: p<0.01) and had better uncorrected near visual acuity (>6/12 versus <6/15: p<0.05)... Similar associations were observed between uncorrected near vision and the perceived impact of reading spectacles on other tasks such as preparing meals, using hand tools or sewing, as well as grooming, shaving, or applying makeup... Neither employment status nor gender had a statistically significant impact on the perceived benefits of reading spectacles... Considering that a store selling reading spectacles for US $1 was located next to the IDES office, this distribution of responses most likely reflects a lack of knowledge about the condition and its readily accessible treatment... Many people who require near vision correction can benefit from ready-made or ‘over-the-counter’ reading spectacles... Considering that the rates of blindness and visual impairment in these groups is significantly greater than that of non-Hispanic whites, this amounts to suboptimal use of eye care services relative to the recommended guidelines for high-risk groups from the American Academy of Ophthalmology... In a country where services are readily available and spectacles are affordable, nearly half of the participants were not aware that this was case... All of the participants would have benefited from a pair of reading spectacles... Health care providers should also be educated about the increased rates of blindness and visual impairment in the African American and Hispanic populations so that they can encourage and refer individuals in these population groups for regularly scheduled eye examinations.

No MeSH data available.