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Understanding your operating microscope's assistant scope and beamsplitter.

Cordero I - Community Eye Health (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Engineer, Philadelphia, USA. ismaelcordero@me.com.

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This is made possible by the beam splitter, which connects the assistant scope to the main visual path of the operating microscope... For, the field of view of the assistant scope coincides with that of the main scope, used by the surgeon... For example, if the surgeon says ‘See the spot at 3 o'clock’, the observer must also see it at 3 o'clock... For, the field of view of the assistant scope must be oriented to match the assistant's own position... In the case of a 50:50 beam splitter, the amount of light is split equally between the main binoculars and the attachment(s), which is what is needed when an assistant scope is used... It is important to note that beam splitters, assistant scopes and other attachments are made for specific models of operating microscopes... Also, the surgeons may need to get used to the weight and balance of the additional equipment... There is a limited amount of weight a suspension arm can effectively hold... This weight is normally labeled on the suspension arm and, if not, this information can be found in the microscope's user manual... If you are considering obtaining an operating microscope for microsurgical training, it is an absolute necessity to have an assistant or teaching scope... Without it, microsurgical training cannot be effective.

No MeSH data available.


Figure 1
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Mentions: This is made possible by the beam splitter, which connects the assistant scope to the main visual path of the operating microscope. The optical components of the assistant scope (Figure 1) are almost identical to the main scope and consist of either fixed or inclinable binoculars. These have adjustable eyepieces for users with refractive error and a stereo observation tube that makes it possible to adjust the binoculars to a position comfortable for the assistant surgeon or trainee.


Understanding your operating microscope's assistant scope and beamsplitter.

Cordero I - Community Eye Health (2014)

Figure 1
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194851&req=5

Figure 2: Figure 1
Mentions: This is made possible by the beam splitter, which connects the assistant scope to the main visual path of the operating microscope. The optical components of the assistant scope (Figure 1) are almost identical to the main scope and consist of either fixed or inclinable binoculars. These have adjustable eyepieces for users with refractive error and a stereo observation tube that makes it possible to adjust the binoculars to a position comfortable for the assistant surgeon or trainee.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Engineer, Philadelphia, USA. ismaelcordero@me.com.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

This is made possible by the beam splitter, which connects the assistant scope to the main visual path of the operating microscope... For, the field of view of the assistant scope coincides with that of the main scope, used by the surgeon... For example, if the surgeon says ‘See the spot at 3 o'clock’, the observer must also see it at 3 o'clock... For, the field of view of the assistant scope must be oriented to match the assistant's own position... In the case of a 50:50 beam splitter, the amount of light is split equally between the main binoculars and the attachment(s), which is what is needed when an assistant scope is used... It is important to note that beam splitters, assistant scopes and other attachments are made for specific models of operating microscopes... Also, the surgeons may need to get used to the weight and balance of the additional equipment... There is a limited amount of weight a suspension arm can effectively hold... This weight is normally labeled on the suspension arm and, if not, this information can be found in the microscope's user manual... If you are considering obtaining an operating microscope for microsurgical training, it is an absolute necessity to have an assistant or teaching scope... Without it, microsurgical training cannot be effective.

No MeSH data available.