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Don't drop the patient: teamwork for cataract surgery.

Patel D, Crook S - Community Eye Health (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: E-learning Director: International Centre for Eye Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. Daksha.patel@lshtm.ac.uk.

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This is done at the community level by health workers – such as primary health care workers and community health workers – who then refer the patient to an ophthalmic clinician for assessment and/or surgery... There is also a return journey: a cataract patient must come back to the community for follow-up and post-operative care, including detection of complications and referral back to the surgical centre if needed... We would like to suggest that much of the responsibility for good teamwork rests with the team at the surgical centre or eye unit, who rely on the health workers in the community to identify and refer patients for surgery and to care for them once they return to the community... As an example, high-volume cataract surgical centres, such as those based in India, work closely with their referral networks to ensure uptake of surgery is not hindered due to delays in the pathways or at the point of treatment... A process for referral, using a protocol, would provide clear and consistent steps to follow... For example: Explain to the patient what has been found and that their sight can be restored... Tell the patient what to expect: what the treatment involves, its safety, possible outcomes and the benefits of treatment... At the surgical centre, the manager must establish good information flow between team members within the eye unit and between them and the health workers in the community... Recognising the various roles within the team (including finance, administration, reception, stores, equipment maintenance, cleaning and pharmacy) will also help to ensure the smooth functioning of the unit... The result – regular procurement of medicines and instruments, good patient flow into theatre and aseptic functioning in operating theaters – will boost both the number of operations and their quality... Good working relationships between the team at the eye unit and the health workers in the community can lead to more effective service delivery, as steps can be taken to ensure neither group is overburdened or under-used... Teamwork can be further strengthened by training, mentoring and active support for workers in the community... All of the above will ensure that the patient receives timely and high-quality service in an efficient and user-friendly style.

No MeSH data available.


Sally Crook
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Figure 2: Sally Crook


Don't drop the patient: teamwork for cataract surgery.

Patel D, Crook S - Community Eye Health (2014)

Sally Crook
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4194842&req=5

Figure 2: Sally Crook

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: E-learning Director: International Centre for Eye Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. Daksha.patel@lshtm.ac.uk.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

This is done at the community level by health workers – such as primary health care workers and community health workers – who then refer the patient to an ophthalmic clinician for assessment and/or surgery... There is also a return journey: a cataract patient must come back to the community for follow-up and post-operative care, including detection of complications and referral back to the surgical centre if needed... We would like to suggest that much of the responsibility for good teamwork rests with the team at the surgical centre or eye unit, who rely on the health workers in the community to identify and refer patients for surgery and to care for them once they return to the community... As an example, high-volume cataract surgical centres, such as those based in India, work closely with their referral networks to ensure uptake of surgery is not hindered due to delays in the pathways or at the point of treatment... A process for referral, using a protocol, would provide clear and consistent steps to follow... For example: Explain to the patient what has been found and that their sight can be restored... Tell the patient what to expect: what the treatment involves, its safety, possible outcomes and the benefits of treatment... At the surgical centre, the manager must establish good information flow between team members within the eye unit and between them and the health workers in the community... Recognising the various roles within the team (including finance, administration, reception, stores, equipment maintenance, cleaning and pharmacy) will also help to ensure the smooth functioning of the unit... The result – regular procurement of medicines and instruments, good patient flow into theatre and aseptic functioning in operating theaters – will boost both the number of operations and their quality... Good working relationships between the team at the eye unit and the health workers in the community can lead to more effective service delivery, as steps can be taken to ensure neither group is overburdened or under-used... Teamwork can be further strengthened by training, mentoring and active support for workers in the community... All of the above will ensure that the patient receives timely and high-quality service in an efficient and user-friendly style.

No MeSH data available.