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Cerebrospinal fluid physiology: visualization of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics using the magnetic resonance imaging Time-Spatial Inversion Pulse method.

Yamada S - Croat. Med. J. (2014)

Bottom Line: Previously there have been no methods for directly tracing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under physiological conditions, and the circulation of CSF has therefore been studied and visualized by injecting a radioactively labeled tracer or contrast medium visible in x-ray images.The CSF dynamics visualized using Time-SLIP has been found to differ markedly from the classical CSF circulation theory described in medical textbooks.Obtaining a more accurate understanding of normal CSF physiology and pathophysiology should lead to improved diagnostic accuracy, permit the identification of new etiological factors in a variety of diseases, and promote the development of new therapeutic approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shinya Yamada, Division of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Rinkan Hospital, 7-9-1 Kamitsuruma, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0385, Japan, shinyakoro@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Previously there have been no methods for directly tracing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under physiological conditions, and the circulation of CSF has therefore been studied and visualized by injecting a radioactively labeled tracer or contrast medium visible in x-ray images. The newly developed Time-Spatial Inversion Pulse (Time-SLIP) method makes it possible to directly visualize the flow of CSF using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), permitting CSF dynamics to be depicted in a certain time frame. The CSF dynamics visualized using Time-SLIP has been found to differ markedly from the classical CSF circulation theory described in medical textbooks. It can be said that research on CSF dynamics has advanced to the next stage with the use of this innovative imaging method. Obtaining a more accurate understanding of normal CSF physiology and pathophysiology should lead to improved diagnostic accuracy, permit the identification of new etiological factors in a variety of diseases, and promote the development of new therapeutic approaches.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the lateral ventricles is depicted (arrow) when radiofrequency (RF) pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (dotted rectangle) in this coronal view of the normal brain. Supplementary video 2.
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Figure 2: The flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the lateral ventricles is depicted (arrow) when radiofrequency (RF) pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (dotted rectangle) in this coronal view of the normal brain. Supplementary video 2.

Mentions: Using Time-SLIP, the flow of CSF from the third ventricle into the lateral ventricles has been observed (Figure 2). CSF flow into the lateral ventricles is seen when RF pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (a process referred to as tagging). Since the flow of CSF had previously been assumed to be from the lateral ventricles to the third ventricle based on the descriptions in medical textbooks, it took some time to understand this finding. This flow is opposite to the conventional concept of CSF physiology and can be described as a backflow into the lateral ventricles.


Cerebrospinal fluid physiology: visualization of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics using the magnetic resonance imaging Time-Spatial Inversion Pulse method.

Yamada S - Croat. Med. J. (2014)

The flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the lateral ventricles is depicted (arrow) when radiofrequency (RF) pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (dotted rectangle) in this coronal view of the normal brain. Supplementary video 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4157376&req=5

Figure 2: The flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the lateral ventricles is depicted (arrow) when radiofrequency (RF) pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (dotted rectangle) in this coronal view of the normal brain. Supplementary video 2.
Mentions: Using Time-SLIP, the flow of CSF from the third ventricle into the lateral ventricles has been observed (Figure 2). CSF flow into the lateral ventricles is seen when RF pulses are applied to the CSF in the third ventricle (a process referred to as tagging). Since the flow of CSF had previously been assumed to be from the lateral ventricles to the third ventricle based on the descriptions in medical textbooks, it took some time to understand this finding. This flow is opposite to the conventional concept of CSF physiology and can be described as a backflow into the lateral ventricles.

Bottom Line: Previously there have been no methods for directly tracing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under physiological conditions, and the circulation of CSF has therefore been studied and visualized by injecting a radioactively labeled tracer or contrast medium visible in x-ray images.The CSF dynamics visualized using Time-SLIP has been found to differ markedly from the classical CSF circulation theory described in medical textbooks.Obtaining a more accurate understanding of normal CSF physiology and pathophysiology should lead to improved diagnostic accuracy, permit the identification of new etiological factors in a variety of diseases, and promote the development of new therapeutic approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shinya Yamada, Division of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Rinkan Hospital, 7-9-1 Kamitsuruma, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0385, Japan, shinyakoro@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Previously there have been no methods for directly tracing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under physiological conditions, and the circulation of CSF has therefore been studied and visualized by injecting a radioactively labeled tracer or contrast medium visible in x-ray images. The newly developed Time-Spatial Inversion Pulse (Time-SLIP) method makes it possible to directly visualize the flow of CSF using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), permitting CSF dynamics to be depicted in a certain time frame. The CSF dynamics visualized using Time-SLIP has been found to differ markedly from the classical CSF circulation theory described in medical textbooks. It can be said that research on CSF dynamics has advanced to the next stage with the use of this innovative imaging method. Obtaining a more accurate understanding of normal CSF physiology and pathophysiology should lead to improved diagnostic accuracy, permit the identification of new etiological factors in a variety of diseases, and promote the development of new therapeutic approaches.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus