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Too big to be noticed: cryptic invasion of Asian camel crickets in North American houses.

Epps MJ, Menninger HL, LaSala N, Dunn RR - PeerJ (2014)

Bottom Line: In so doing, we show that the exotic Diestrammena asynamora not only has become a common presence in eastern houses, but is found in these environments far more frequently than native camel crickets.The number of D. asynamora individuals present in a trap was negatively correlated with the trap's distance from a house, suggesting that these insects may be preferentially associated with houses but also are present outside.Our results offer new insight into the relative frequency and distribution of camel crickets living in human homes, and emphasize the importance of the built environment as habitat for two little-known invading species of Orthoptera.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University , Raleigh, NC , USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite the rapid expansion of the built environment, we know little about the biology of species living in human-constructed habitats. Camel crickets (Rhaphidophoridae) are commonly observed in North American houses and include a range of native taxa as well as the Asian Diestrammena asynamora (Adelung), a species occasionally reported from houses though considered to be established only in greenhouses. We launched a continental-scale citizen science campaign to better understand the relative distributions and frequency of native and nonnative camel crickets in human homes across North America. Participants contributed survey data about the presence or absence of camel crickets in homes, as well as photographs and specimens of camel crickets allowing us to identify the major genera and/or species in and around houses. Together, these data offer insight into the geographical distribution of camel crickets as a presence in homes, as well as the relative frequency and distribution of native and nonnative camel crickets encountered in houses. In so doing, we show that the exotic Diestrammena asynamora not only has become a common presence in eastern houses, but is found in these environments far more frequently than native camel crickets. Supplemental pitfall trapping along transects in 10 urban yards in Raleigh, NC revealed that D. asynamora can be extremely abundant locally around some homes, with as many as 52 individuals collected from pitfalls in a single yard over two days of sampling. The number of D. asynamora individuals present in a trap was negatively correlated with the trap's distance from a house, suggesting that these insects may be preferentially associated with houses but also are present outside. In addition, we report the establishment in the northeastern United States of a second exotic species, putatively Diestrammena japanica Blatchley, which was previously undocumented in the literature. Our results offer new insight into the relative frequency and distribution of camel crickets living in human homes, and emphasize the importance of the built environment as habitat for two little-known invading species of Orthoptera.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of households by state reporting the presence of camel crickets around the home.Responses to the Wild Life of Our Home survey, showing the percentage of households from each state answering ‘yes’ to the question ‘have you seen camel crickets in or around your home?’. Numerals in each state represent the total number of responses (yes or no) for that state.
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fig-1: Percentage of households by state reporting the presence of camel crickets around the home.Responses to the Wild Life of Our Home survey, showing the percentage of households from each state answering ‘yes’ to the question ‘have you seen camel crickets in or around your home?’. Numerals in each state represent the total number of responses (yes or no) for that state.

Mentions: Individuals from 549 homes responded to our initial open survey question about the presence or absence of camel crickets in or around their houses, offering positive reports of camel crickets for 244 homes across the country. An additional 1,719 households responded to the unbiased (with respect to camel cricket presence) WLOH participant questionnaire. Over both surveys, participants from 669 houses reported having observed camel crickets in their homes, including 24.4% of households responding to the unbiased WLOH study (Fig. 1). Together, these surveys allowed us to evaluate the potential distribution of camel crickets associated with human houses across the United States. We use the word “detection” to acknowledge that reports of absence in survey data may reflect failures to detect camel crickets, just as presences may represent failures at identification. For example, a large spider might bear a vague resemblance to a camel cricket for a participant wary of arthropods. Participants from 39 states and the District of Columbia reported observing camel crickets in or around their homes (Fig. 2). The proportion of detections of camel crickets in homes was significantly higher in the eastern United States (28% of reports were positive from states east of Colorado) compared to western states (7% positive reports; two-tailed P < 0.0001 from Fisher’s exact test). Based on the proportion of photographs showing insects incorrectly identified as camel crickets by citizen scientists who responded to our call for photographs (see below), we estimated a 4.6% error rate associated with affirmative reports of camel crickets from all survey data, although this error rate may vary geographically. From Colorado westward only five photographs were submitted, of which 40% (2 of 5) were identified incorrectly as Rhaphidophoridae. The most common taxa mistaken for camel crickets were field crickets (Gryllidae) or other Orthoptera.


Too big to be noticed: cryptic invasion of Asian camel crickets in North American houses.

Epps MJ, Menninger HL, LaSala N, Dunn RR - PeerJ (2014)

Percentage of households by state reporting the presence of camel crickets around the home.Responses to the Wild Life of Our Home survey, showing the percentage of households from each state answering ‘yes’ to the question ‘have you seen camel crickets in or around your home?’. Numerals in each state represent the total number of responses (yes or no) for that state.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4157299&req=5

fig-1: Percentage of households by state reporting the presence of camel crickets around the home.Responses to the Wild Life of Our Home survey, showing the percentage of households from each state answering ‘yes’ to the question ‘have you seen camel crickets in or around your home?’. Numerals in each state represent the total number of responses (yes or no) for that state.
Mentions: Individuals from 549 homes responded to our initial open survey question about the presence or absence of camel crickets in or around their houses, offering positive reports of camel crickets for 244 homes across the country. An additional 1,719 households responded to the unbiased (with respect to camel cricket presence) WLOH participant questionnaire. Over both surveys, participants from 669 houses reported having observed camel crickets in their homes, including 24.4% of households responding to the unbiased WLOH study (Fig. 1). Together, these surveys allowed us to evaluate the potential distribution of camel crickets associated with human houses across the United States. We use the word “detection” to acknowledge that reports of absence in survey data may reflect failures to detect camel crickets, just as presences may represent failures at identification. For example, a large spider might bear a vague resemblance to a camel cricket for a participant wary of arthropods. Participants from 39 states and the District of Columbia reported observing camel crickets in or around their homes (Fig. 2). The proportion of detections of camel crickets in homes was significantly higher in the eastern United States (28% of reports were positive from states east of Colorado) compared to western states (7% positive reports; two-tailed P < 0.0001 from Fisher’s exact test). Based on the proportion of photographs showing insects incorrectly identified as camel crickets by citizen scientists who responded to our call for photographs (see below), we estimated a 4.6% error rate associated with affirmative reports of camel crickets from all survey data, although this error rate may vary geographically. From Colorado westward only five photographs were submitted, of which 40% (2 of 5) were identified incorrectly as Rhaphidophoridae. The most common taxa mistaken for camel crickets were field crickets (Gryllidae) or other Orthoptera.

Bottom Line: In so doing, we show that the exotic Diestrammena asynamora not only has become a common presence in eastern houses, but is found in these environments far more frequently than native camel crickets.The number of D. asynamora individuals present in a trap was negatively correlated with the trap's distance from a house, suggesting that these insects may be preferentially associated with houses but also are present outside.Our results offer new insight into the relative frequency and distribution of camel crickets living in human homes, and emphasize the importance of the built environment as habitat for two little-known invading species of Orthoptera.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University , Raleigh, NC , USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite the rapid expansion of the built environment, we know little about the biology of species living in human-constructed habitats. Camel crickets (Rhaphidophoridae) are commonly observed in North American houses and include a range of native taxa as well as the Asian Diestrammena asynamora (Adelung), a species occasionally reported from houses though considered to be established only in greenhouses. We launched a continental-scale citizen science campaign to better understand the relative distributions and frequency of native and nonnative camel crickets in human homes across North America. Participants contributed survey data about the presence or absence of camel crickets in homes, as well as photographs and specimens of camel crickets allowing us to identify the major genera and/or species in and around houses. Together, these data offer insight into the geographical distribution of camel crickets as a presence in homes, as well as the relative frequency and distribution of native and nonnative camel crickets encountered in houses. In so doing, we show that the exotic Diestrammena asynamora not only has become a common presence in eastern houses, but is found in these environments far more frequently than native camel crickets. Supplemental pitfall trapping along transects in 10 urban yards in Raleigh, NC revealed that D. asynamora can be extremely abundant locally around some homes, with as many as 52 individuals collected from pitfalls in a single yard over two days of sampling. The number of D. asynamora individuals present in a trap was negatively correlated with the trap's distance from a house, suggesting that these insects may be preferentially associated with houses but also are present outside. In addition, we report the establishment in the northeastern United States of a second exotic species, putatively Diestrammena japanica Blatchley, which was previously undocumented in the literature. Our results offer new insight into the relative frequency and distribution of camel crickets living in human homes, and emphasize the importance of the built environment as habitat for two little-known invading species of Orthoptera.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus