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Metabolic fingerprinting of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) liver to track interactions between dietary factors and seasonal temperature variations.

Silva TS, da Costa AM, Conceição LE, Dias JP, Rodrigues PM, Richard N - PeerJ (2014)

Bottom Line: It is caused, among other factors, by the thermal variations that occur during colder months and there are signs that an improved nutritional status can mitigate the effects of this thermal stress.Results have shown that seasonal temperature variations constitute a metabolic challenge for gilthead seabream, with hepatic carbohydrate stores being consumed over the course of the inter-sampling period.Regarding the WF diet, results point towards a positive effect in terms of performance and improved nutritional status.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: SPAROS Lda. , Olhão , Portugal ; CCMAR, Centre of Marine Sciences of Algarve, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas , Faro , Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Farmed gilthead seabream is sometimes affected by a metabolic syndrome, known as the "winter disease", which has a significant economic impact in the Mediterranean region. It is caused, among other factors, by the thermal variations that occur during colder months and there are signs that an improved nutritional status can mitigate the effects of this thermal stress. For this reason, a trial was undertaken where we assessed the effect of two different diets on gilthead seabream physiology and nutritional state, through metabolic fingerprinting of hepatic tissue. For this trial, four groups of 25 adult gilthead seabream were reared for 8 months, being fed either with a control diet (CTRL, low-cost commercial formulation) or with a diet called "Winter Feed" (WF, high-cost improved formulation). Fish were sampled at two time-points (at the end of winter and at the end of spring), with liver tissue being taken for FT-IR spectroscopy. Results have shown that seasonal temperature variations constitute a metabolic challenge for gilthead seabream, with hepatic carbohydrate stores being consumed over the course of the inter-sampling period. Regarding the WF diet, results point towards a positive effect in terms of performance and improved nutritional status. This diet seems to have a mitigating effect on the deleterious impact of thermal shifts, confirming the hypothesis that nutritional factors can affect the capacity of gilthead seabream to cope with seasonal thermal variations and possibly contribute to prevent the onset of "winter disease".

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal temperature profile.Plot showing the daily mean water temperature (black line) throughout the trial. The full range of temperatures are denoted by the area shaded in gray. Relevant dates (trial start, 1st sampling and 2nd sampling) are shown directly in the plot. The blue horizontal lines indicate the mean temperature over the course of the two inter-sampling periods. The red shading indicates the temperature threshold below which gilthead seabream generally display voluntary fasting (12–13 °C).
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fig-1: Seasonal temperature profile.Plot showing the daily mean water temperature (black line) throughout the trial. The full range of temperatures are denoted by the area shaded in gray. Relevant dates (trial start, 1st sampling and 2nd sampling) are shown directly in the plot. The blue horizontal lines indicate the mean temperature over the course of the two inter-sampling periods. The red shading indicates the temperature threshold below which gilthead seabream generally display voluntary fasting (12–13 °C).

Mentions: The experiment was conducted at the Experimental Research Station of CCMAR (37°00′ N, 07°58′ W, Faro, Portugal) and took place between November and June of the following year. Four homogenous groups of 25 gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) each, with a mean initial body weight of 87 ± 5 g, were stocked in 1000 L outdoor circular plastic tanks supplied with flow-through seawater (rearing density of about 2.18 kg m−3). Throughout the trial, fish were subjected to a natural temperature regime, which was logged every hour (Fig. 1), with mean daily temperatures ranging from 7.6 °C to 25.0 °C. Similarly, other physicochemical parameters varied within the natural ranges (natural photoperiod, salinity: 33 ± 2%, dissolved oxygen: above 5 mg L−1). Each dietary treatment was tested in duplicate tanks over 213 days. Fish were fed to apparent satiety, by hand, either once a day (at 10.00 h, during the winter period), or twice a day (at 10.00 and 16.00 h, during the spring period) and feed intake was recorded. Prior to harvesting for sampling, fish were starved for 48 h.


Metabolic fingerprinting of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) liver to track interactions between dietary factors and seasonal temperature variations.

Silva TS, da Costa AM, Conceição LE, Dias JP, Rodrigues PM, Richard N - PeerJ (2014)

Seasonal temperature profile.Plot showing the daily mean water temperature (black line) throughout the trial. The full range of temperatures are denoted by the area shaded in gray. Relevant dates (trial start, 1st sampling and 2nd sampling) are shown directly in the plot. The blue horizontal lines indicate the mean temperature over the course of the two inter-sampling periods. The red shading indicates the temperature threshold below which gilthead seabream generally display voluntary fasting (12–13 °C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4157298&req=5

fig-1: Seasonal temperature profile.Plot showing the daily mean water temperature (black line) throughout the trial. The full range of temperatures are denoted by the area shaded in gray. Relevant dates (trial start, 1st sampling and 2nd sampling) are shown directly in the plot. The blue horizontal lines indicate the mean temperature over the course of the two inter-sampling periods. The red shading indicates the temperature threshold below which gilthead seabream generally display voluntary fasting (12–13 °C).
Mentions: The experiment was conducted at the Experimental Research Station of CCMAR (37°00′ N, 07°58′ W, Faro, Portugal) and took place between November and June of the following year. Four homogenous groups of 25 gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) each, with a mean initial body weight of 87 ± 5 g, were stocked in 1000 L outdoor circular plastic tanks supplied with flow-through seawater (rearing density of about 2.18 kg m−3). Throughout the trial, fish were subjected to a natural temperature regime, which was logged every hour (Fig. 1), with mean daily temperatures ranging from 7.6 °C to 25.0 °C. Similarly, other physicochemical parameters varied within the natural ranges (natural photoperiod, salinity: 33 ± 2%, dissolved oxygen: above 5 mg L−1). Each dietary treatment was tested in duplicate tanks over 213 days. Fish were fed to apparent satiety, by hand, either once a day (at 10.00 h, during the winter period), or twice a day (at 10.00 and 16.00 h, during the spring period) and feed intake was recorded. Prior to harvesting for sampling, fish were starved for 48 h.

Bottom Line: It is caused, among other factors, by the thermal variations that occur during colder months and there are signs that an improved nutritional status can mitigate the effects of this thermal stress.Results have shown that seasonal temperature variations constitute a metabolic challenge for gilthead seabream, with hepatic carbohydrate stores being consumed over the course of the inter-sampling period.Regarding the WF diet, results point towards a positive effect in terms of performance and improved nutritional status.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: SPAROS Lda. , Olhão , Portugal ; CCMAR, Centre of Marine Sciences of Algarve, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas , Faro , Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Farmed gilthead seabream is sometimes affected by a metabolic syndrome, known as the "winter disease", which has a significant economic impact in the Mediterranean region. It is caused, among other factors, by the thermal variations that occur during colder months and there are signs that an improved nutritional status can mitigate the effects of this thermal stress. For this reason, a trial was undertaken where we assessed the effect of two different diets on gilthead seabream physiology and nutritional state, through metabolic fingerprinting of hepatic tissue. For this trial, four groups of 25 adult gilthead seabream were reared for 8 months, being fed either with a control diet (CTRL, low-cost commercial formulation) or with a diet called "Winter Feed" (WF, high-cost improved formulation). Fish were sampled at two time-points (at the end of winter and at the end of spring), with liver tissue being taken for FT-IR spectroscopy. Results have shown that seasonal temperature variations constitute a metabolic challenge for gilthead seabream, with hepatic carbohydrate stores being consumed over the course of the inter-sampling period. Regarding the WF diet, results point towards a positive effect in terms of performance and improved nutritional status. This diet seems to have a mitigating effect on the deleterious impact of thermal shifts, confirming the hypothesis that nutritional factors can affect the capacity of gilthead seabream to cope with seasonal thermal variations and possibly contribute to prevent the onset of "winter disease".

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus