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Maxillofacial trauma in children.

Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U - Int J Clin Pediatr Dent (2012)

Bottom Line: How to cite this article: Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U.Maxillofacial Trauma in Children.Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):231-236.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Pedodontia, Buddha Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Gandhi Nagar, Kankarbagh, Patna-800020, Bihar India, e-mail: chitritagm@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric trauma involving the bones of the face is associated with severe injury and disability. Although much is known about the epidemiology of facial fractures in adults, little is known about injury patterns and outcomes in children. The most common facial fractures were mandible, nasal and maxillary/zygoma. The most common mechanisms of injury are motor vehicle collisions, violence and falls. These fracture patterns and mechanisms of injury varies with age. Cranial and central facial injuries are more common among toddlers and infants, and mandible injuries are more common among adolescents. Although bony craniofacial trauma is relatively uncommon among the pediatric population, it remains a substantial source of mortality, morbidity and hospital admissions. Continued efforts toward injury prevention are warranted. An overview of various types of fractures and their management modalities is discussed, with case reports. How to cite this article: Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U. Maxillofacial Trauma in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):231-236.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

History of fall, with right periorbital swelling and nasal bone fracture
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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F7a: History of fall, with right periorbital swelling and nasal bone fracture

Mentions: A 4-year-old boy sustained head injury with a huge periorbital swelling of right eye, following a fall from height. The 3D CT revealed a fracture nasal bone and frontal bone fracture. The treatment was conservative due to his head injury (Figs 7A and B).


Maxillofacial trauma in children.

Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U - Int J Clin Pediatr Dent (2012)

History of fall, with right periorbital swelling and nasal bone fracture
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155887&req=5

F7a: History of fall, with right periorbital swelling and nasal bone fracture
Mentions: A 4-year-old boy sustained head injury with a huge periorbital swelling of right eye, following a fall from height. The 3D CT revealed a fracture nasal bone and frontal bone fracture. The treatment was conservative due to his head injury (Figs 7A and B).

Bottom Line: How to cite this article: Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U.Maxillofacial Trauma in Children.Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):231-236.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Pedodontia, Buddha Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Gandhi Nagar, Kankarbagh, Patna-800020, Bihar India, e-mail: chitritagm@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric trauma involving the bones of the face is associated with severe injury and disability. Although much is known about the epidemiology of facial fractures in adults, little is known about injury patterns and outcomes in children. The most common facial fractures were mandible, nasal and maxillary/zygoma. The most common mechanisms of injury are motor vehicle collisions, violence and falls. These fracture patterns and mechanisms of injury varies with age. Cranial and central facial injuries are more common among toddlers and infants, and mandible injuries are more common among adolescents. Although bony craniofacial trauma is relatively uncommon among the pediatric population, it remains a substantial source of mortality, morbidity and hospital admissions. Continued efforts toward injury prevention are warranted. An overview of various types of fractures and their management modalities is discussed, with case reports. How to cite this article: Mukherjee CG, Mukherjee U. Maxillofacial Trauma in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):231-236.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus