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Impacted supernumerary teeth-early or delayed intervention: decision making dilemma?

Gupta S, Marwah N - Int J Clin Pediatr Dent (2012)

Bottom Line: However, the time of intervention is the most crucial factor governing the outcome of surgical management of hyperdontia.Impacted Supernumerary Teeth-Early or Delayed Intervention: Decision Making Dilemma?.Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):226-230.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Senior Resident, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi, India, e-mail: seema.mds@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Supernumerary teeth are considered to be one of the most significant dental anomalies affecting the primary and early mixed dentition and may cause a variety of pathological disturbances to the developing permanent dentition. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is necessary for prevention of deleterious effects on dentoalveolar structures. However, the time of intervention is the most crucial factor governing the outcome of surgical management of hyperdontia. The aim of this case report is to share knowledge about management of such cases, which might assist the clinician in decision-making in cases of impacted supernumerary teeth. How to cite this article: Gupta S, Marwah N. Impacted Supernumerary Teeth-Early or Delayed Intervention: Decision Making Dilemma?. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):226-230.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoral photograph showing removal of impacted supernumerary tooth (case I)
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Figure 4: Intraoral photograph showing removal of impacted supernumerary tooth (case I)

Mentions: An 11-year-old male child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, with a chief complaint of an extra tooth. The intraoral examination confirmed the patient's chief complaint and an erupted supernumerary tooth, located palatally, tuberculate in shape was located (Fig. 1). Radiographic examination revealed the presence of two supernumerary teeth, one erupted and one impacted, both in normal vertical alignment (Fig. 2). The medical history of the child was nonsignificant and he was born to non- consanguineous parents. The treatment plan involved surgical removal of both the mesiodentes after taking parent consent. Prior to surgical procedure, complete hematological investigations were performed to rule out any possible complications. The child was administered local anesthesia (greater palatine and nasopalatine nerve block). The palatally erupted mesiodens was extracted first (Fig. 3) and a full thickness palatal flap was raised using a mucoperiosteal elevator. The impacted tooth was exposed, luxated out of its socket and removed (Fig. 4). Hemostasis was achieved and the flap was replaced back and sutured with nonresorbable black silk suture. Postsurgical instructions were explained to the patient and he was kept on analgesic and antibiotic coverage. Patient was instructed to maintain a good oral hygiene using a soft bristle toothbrush and chlorhexidine mouthwash twice daily. The recall visits was scheduled for 1 week for suture removal and evaluation of healing followed by a 6 monthly recall pattern for continued observation. The patient is on follow-up for the last 1 year.


Impacted supernumerary teeth-early or delayed intervention: decision making dilemma?

Gupta S, Marwah N - Int J Clin Pediatr Dent (2012)

Intraoral photograph showing removal of impacted supernumerary tooth (case I)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155876&req=5

Figure 4: Intraoral photograph showing removal of impacted supernumerary tooth (case I)
Mentions: An 11-year-old male child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, with a chief complaint of an extra tooth. The intraoral examination confirmed the patient's chief complaint and an erupted supernumerary tooth, located palatally, tuberculate in shape was located (Fig. 1). Radiographic examination revealed the presence of two supernumerary teeth, one erupted and one impacted, both in normal vertical alignment (Fig. 2). The medical history of the child was nonsignificant and he was born to non- consanguineous parents. The treatment plan involved surgical removal of both the mesiodentes after taking parent consent. Prior to surgical procedure, complete hematological investigations were performed to rule out any possible complications. The child was administered local anesthesia (greater palatine and nasopalatine nerve block). The palatally erupted mesiodens was extracted first (Fig. 3) and a full thickness palatal flap was raised using a mucoperiosteal elevator. The impacted tooth was exposed, luxated out of its socket and removed (Fig. 4). Hemostasis was achieved and the flap was replaced back and sutured with nonresorbable black silk suture. Postsurgical instructions were explained to the patient and he was kept on analgesic and antibiotic coverage. Patient was instructed to maintain a good oral hygiene using a soft bristle toothbrush and chlorhexidine mouthwash twice daily. The recall visits was scheduled for 1 week for suture removal and evaluation of healing followed by a 6 monthly recall pattern for continued observation. The patient is on follow-up for the last 1 year.

Bottom Line: However, the time of intervention is the most crucial factor governing the outcome of surgical management of hyperdontia.Impacted Supernumerary Teeth-Early or Delayed Intervention: Decision Making Dilemma?.Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):226-230.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Senior Resident, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi, India, e-mail: seema.mds@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Supernumerary teeth are considered to be one of the most significant dental anomalies affecting the primary and early mixed dentition and may cause a variety of pathological disturbances to the developing permanent dentition. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is necessary for prevention of deleterious effects on dentoalveolar structures. However, the time of intervention is the most crucial factor governing the outcome of surgical management of hyperdontia. The aim of this case report is to share knowledge about management of such cases, which might assist the clinician in decision-making in cases of impacted supernumerary teeth. How to cite this article: Gupta S, Marwah N. Impacted Supernumerary Teeth-Early or Delayed Intervention: Decision Making Dilemma?. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):226-230.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus