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Secrets of platelet exocytosis - what do we really know about platelet secretion mechanisms?

Golebiewska EM, Poole AW - Br. J. Haematol. (2013)

Bottom Line: Upon activation by extracellular matrix components or soluble agonists, platelets release in excess of 300 active molecules from intracellular granules.The complex microenvironment of a growing thrombus, as well as platelets' roles in both physiological and pathological processes, require platelet secretion to be highly spatially and temporally regulated to ensure appropriate responses to a range of stimuli.However, how this regulation is achieved remains incompletely understood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physiology and Pharmacology, Bristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vesicle (v) and target (t) SNAREs reside on opposing membranes. (A) In response to stimulus the vesicle translocates near to the target membrane and the four SNARE domains associate. (B) A conformational change in the complex brings the membranes close together and (C) eventually leads to overcoming the energy barrier enabling (D) fusion of the membranes and release of granular contents. This model and the core SNARE machinery is ubiquitously expressed throughout eukaryotic cells.
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fig02: Vesicle (v) and target (t) SNAREs reside on opposing membranes. (A) In response to stimulus the vesicle translocates near to the target membrane and the four SNARE domains associate. (B) A conformational change in the complex brings the membranes close together and (C) eventually leads to overcoming the energy barrier enabling (D) fusion of the membranes and release of granular contents. This model and the core SNARE machinery is ubiquitously expressed throughout eukaryotic cells.

Mentions: In the simplest terms, SNARE-mediated fusion involves transport of the vesicle to the target membrane and ‘priming’ it for release, followed by calcium-mediated conformational change in the complex that leads to the completion of membrane fusion leading to release of granule contents (Fig 2).


Secrets of platelet exocytosis - what do we really know about platelet secretion mechanisms?

Golebiewska EM, Poole AW - Br. J. Haematol. (2013)

Vesicle (v) and target (t) SNAREs reside on opposing membranes. (A) In response to stimulus the vesicle translocates near to the target membrane and the four SNARE domains associate. (B) A conformational change in the complex brings the membranes close together and (C) eventually leads to overcoming the energy barrier enabling (D) fusion of the membranes and release of granular contents. This model and the core SNARE machinery is ubiquitously expressed throughout eukaryotic cells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155865&req=5

fig02: Vesicle (v) and target (t) SNAREs reside on opposing membranes. (A) In response to stimulus the vesicle translocates near to the target membrane and the four SNARE domains associate. (B) A conformational change in the complex brings the membranes close together and (C) eventually leads to overcoming the energy barrier enabling (D) fusion of the membranes and release of granular contents. This model and the core SNARE machinery is ubiquitously expressed throughout eukaryotic cells.
Mentions: In the simplest terms, SNARE-mediated fusion involves transport of the vesicle to the target membrane and ‘priming’ it for release, followed by calcium-mediated conformational change in the complex that leads to the completion of membrane fusion leading to release of granule contents (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: Upon activation by extracellular matrix components or soluble agonists, platelets release in excess of 300 active molecules from intracellular granules.The complex microenvironment of a growing thrombus, as well as platelets' roles in both physiological and pathological processes, require platelet secretion to be highly spatially and temporally regulated to ensure appropriate responses to a range of stimuli.However, how this regulation is achieved remains incompletely understood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physiology and Pharmacology, Bristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus