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Comparison of fat maintenance in the face with centrifuge versus filtered and washed fat.

Asilian A, Siadat AH, Iraji R - J Res Med Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: This study compared the clinical results obtained using simple filtered and washed fat via metal sieve with those achieved by means of pure centrifuged fat.Acquired data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 and a value of P > 0.05 was considered as significant.Our data suggest that the centrifuge of the fat does not enhance survival of grafted fat (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Skin Disease and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Autogenous fat injection of the face is a viable and lasting remedy for soft tissue loss and has become a mainstay in facial rejuvenation. Fat transfer as either a stand-alone technique or as an adjunct to other filler technique and lifting depending on patient needs. Although soft tissue augmentation with autologous fat transfer has been increasingly used by esthetic surgeon, but there is no agreement concerning the best way of processing the harvested fat before injection. This study compared the clinical results obtained using simple filtered and washed fat via metal sieve with those achieved by means of pure centrifuged fat.

Materials and methods: A prospective single-blind analysis on 32 healthy patients undergoing nasolabial fold fat transplantation from 2009 to 2011 (simple sampling). Patients assigned in two groups randomly. The face of half (16 subjects) was injected with centrifuged, another half with simple filtered and washed fat to evaluate the effect of preparation methods on fat graft viability. Objective method was used to evaluate the results, involving the evaluation of postoperative photographs (in month 1, 6 and 12) by an esthetic surgeon (according to the nasolabial scale). Subjective method was a self-assessment obtained from patients about general level of satisfaction and improvement of skin texture, statistical analysis were performed by means of the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney test. Acquired data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 and a value of P > 0.05 was considered as significant.

Results: There was no significant difference in the survival of grafted fat between the Group 1 (fat-processing with centrifuge at 3400 rpm for 1-min) and Group 2 (washing the fat in the sieve).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that the centrifuge of the fat does not enhance survival of grafted fat (P > 0.05).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group 1 (centrifuge) presurgery
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Figure 5: Group 1 (centrifuge) presurgery

Mentions: Photographs were obtained preoperatively and systematically at month 1, 6, 12 postoperatively [Figures 5-10]. Position, facial expression and camera setting were standardized. Subjective and objective methods were used to assess the results.


Comparison of fat maintenance in the face with centrifuge versus filtered and washed fat.

Asilian A, Siadat AH, Iraji R - J Res Med Sci (2014)

Group 1 (centrifuge) presurgery
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155712&req=5

Figure 5: Group 1 (centrifuge) presurgery
Mentions: Photographs were obtained preoperatively and systematically at month 1, 6, 12 postoperatively [Figures 5-10]. Position, facial expression and camera setting were standardized. Subjective and objective methods were used to assess the results.

Bottom Line: This study compared the clinical results obtained using simple filtered and washed fat via metal sieve with those achieved by means of pure centrifuged fat.Acquired data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 and a value of P > 0.05 was considered as significant.Our data suggest that the centrifuge of the fat does not enhance survival of grafted fat (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Skin Disease and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Autogenous fat injection of the face is a viable and lasting remedy for soft tissue loss and has become a mainstay in facial rejuvenation. Fat transfer as either a stand-alone technique or as an adjunct to other filler technique and lifting depending on patient needs. Although soft tissue augmentation with autologous fat transfer has been increasingly used by esthetic surgeon, but there is no agreement concerning the best way of processing the harvested fat before injection. This study compared the clinical results obtained using simple filtered and washed fat via metal sieve with those achieved by means of pure centrifuged fat.

Materials and methods: A prospective single-blind analysis on 32 healthy patients undergoing nasolabial fold fat transplantation from 2009 to 2011 (simple sampling). Patients assigned in two groups randomly. The face of half (16 subjects) was injected with centrifuged, another half with simple filtered and washed fat to evaluate the effect of preparation methods on fat graft viability. Objective method was used to evaluate the results, involving the evaluation of postoperative photographs (in month 1, 6 and 12) by an esthetic surgeon (according to the nasolabial scale). Subjective method was a self-assessment obtained from patients about general level of satisfaction and improvement of skin texture, statistical analysis were performed by means of the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney test. Acquired data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 and a value of P > 0.05 was considered as significant.

Results: There was no significant difference in the survival of grafted fat between the Group 1 (fat-processing with centrifuge at 3400 rpm for 1-min) and Group 2 (washing the fat in the sieve).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that the centrifuge of the fat does not enhance survival of grafted fat (P > 0.05).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus