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Community pharmacy-based intervention to improve self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetic patients.

Müller U, Hämmerlein A, Casper A, Schulz M - Pharm Pract (Granada) (2006)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the study aimed to determine to what extent a single standardized SMBG instruction session in a community pharmacy might reduce the number of patients making errors or the number of errors per patient.The average number of mistakes fell from 3.1 to 0.8 per patient.It is important to periodically instruct type 2 diabetic patients in the proper SMBG technique in order to ensure accurate measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Drug Information and Pharmacy Practice, ABDA - Federal Union of German Associations of Pharmacists. Berlin ( Germany ).

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is clearly correlated with increased life expectancy and quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients.

Objective: The objective of our study was to record and assess the errors patients make in preparing, performing, and processing self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Furthermore, the study aimed to determine to what extent a single standardized SMBG instruction session in a community pharmacy might reduce the number of patients making errors or the number of errors per patient.

Methods: Between May and October 2005, SMBG of 462 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes was monitored in 32 pharmacies specialized in diabetes care. The patients performed blood glucose self-tests using their own blood glucose meters. Self-testing was monitored using a standardized documentation sheet on which any error made during the performance of the test was recorded. If necessary, patients were instructed in the accurate operation of their meter and the use of the necessary equipment. Additionally, patients obtained written instructions. Six weeks later, assessment of the quality of patient's SMBG was repeated.

Results: During the first observation, 383 patients (83%) made at least one mistake performing SMBG. By the time of the second observation, this frequency had fallen to 189 (41%) (p<0.001). The average number of mistakes fell from 3.1 to 0.8 per patient. Mistakes that may potentially have led to inaccurate readings were initially recorded for 283 (61%) and at study end for 110 (24%) patients (p<0.001).

Conclusion: It is important to periodically instruct type 2 diabetic patients in the proper SMBG technique in order to ensure accurate measurements. In this study it was shown that community pharmacies specialized in diabetes care can provide this service effectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Suggestion for an implementation scheme to integrate the evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies in the healthcare process of individuals with type 2 diabetes
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 2: Suggestion for an implementation scheme to integrate the evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies in the healthcare process of individuals with type 2 diabetes

Mentions: Through a one-time intervention as described here, the number of patients making mistakes in SMBG was reduced by half over a period of six weeks. In view of this background, the results of the present study are practice relevant. A concept like in figure 2 could possibly show how an evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies can be integrated into the given care process of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Accordingly, such an evaluation could take place following the physician’s diabetes management education program. Patients who measure without making any mistakes should repeat this process once a year or when they switch to another blood glucose meter. Patients who make mistakes in carrying out their SMBG should receive instruction in the pharmacy once. If this does not lead to error- free self-testing, remedial training should be given by the physician and his diabetes team.


Community pharmacy-based intervention to improve self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetic patients.

Müller U, Hämmerlein A, Casper A, Schulz M - Pharm Pract (Granada) (2006)

Suggestion for an implementation scheme to integrate the evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies in the healthcare process of individuals with type 2 diabetes
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155622&req=5

Figure 2: Suggestion for an implementation scheme to integrate the evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies in the healthcare process of individuals with type 2 diabetes
Mentions: Through a one-time intervention as described here, the number of patients making mistakes in SMBG was reduced by half over a period of six weeks. In view of this background, the results of the present study are practice relevant. A concept like in figure 2 could possibly show how an evaluation of SMBG in pharmacies can be integrated into the given care process of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Accordingly, such an evaluation could take place following the physician’s diabetes management education program. Patients who measure without making any mistakes should repeat this process once a year or when they switch to another blood glucose meter. Patients who make mistakes in carrying out their SMBG should receive instruction in the pharmacy once. If this does not lead to error- free self-testing, remedial training should be given by the physician and his diabetes team.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the study aimed to determine to what extent a single standardized SMBG instruction session in a community pharmacy might reduce the number of patients making errors or the number of errors per patient.The average number of mistakes fell from 3.1 to 0.8 per patient.It is important to periodically instruct type 2 diabetic patients in the proper SMBG technique in order to ensure accurate measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Drug Information and Pharmacy Practice, ABDA - Federal Union of German Associations of Pharmacists. Berlin ( Germany ).

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is clearly correlated with increased life expectancy and quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients.

Objective: The objective of our study was to record and assess the errors patients make in preparing, performing, and processing self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Furthermore, the study aimed to determine to what extent a single standardized SMBG instruction session in a community pharmacy might reduce the number of patients making errors or the number of errors per patient.

Methods: Between May and October 2005, SMBG of 462 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes was monitored in 32 pharmacies specialized in diabetes care. The patients performed blood glucose self-tests using their own blood glucose meters. Self-testing was monitored using a standardized documentation sheet on which any error made during the performance of the test was recorded. If necessary, patients were instructed in the accurate operation of their meter and the use of the necessary equipment. Additionally, patients obtained written instructions. Six weeks later, assessment of the quality of patient's SMBG was repeated.

Results: During the first observation, 383 patients (83%) made at least one mistake performing SMBG. By the time of the second observation, this frequency had fallen to 189 (41%) (p<0.001). The average number of mistakes fell from 3.1 to 0.8 per patient. Mistakes that may potentially have led to inaccurate readings were initially recorded for 283 (61%) and at study end for 110 (24%) patients (p<0.001).

Conclusion: It is important to periodically instruct type 2 diabetic patients in the proper SMBG technique in order to ensure accurate measurements. In this study it was shown that community pharmacies specialized in diabetes care can provide this service effectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus