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The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on the economic burden of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Brazil and potential value of new CL drug treatments.

Kruchten SD, Bacon KM, Lee BY - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: The HIV co-infection increased lifetime cost per CL case 11-371 times ($1,349-45,683) that of HIV-negative individuals ($123) and Brazil's CL burden from $1.6-16.0 million to $1.6-65.5 million.A new treatment could be a cost saving at ≤ $254 across several ranges (treatments seeking probabilities, side effect risks, cure rates) and continues to save costs up to $508 across treatment-seeking probabilities with a drug cure rate of ≥ 50%.The HIV co-infection can increase CL burden, suggesting more joint HIV and CL surveillance and control efforts are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Public Health Computational and Operations Research (PHICOR), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Model structure. (A) Markov health states and transition possibilities for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative individuals (cutaneous leishmaniasis [CL] Infection) as described in Bacon and others.4 (B) Markov health states and transition possibilities for HIV-positive individuals (CL/HIV Co-Infection). Gray shading indicates states where both CL and CL/HIV co-infection cases could begin.
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Figure 1: Model structure. (A) Markov health states and transition possibilities for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative individuals (cutaneous leishmaniasis [CL] Infection) as described in Bacon and others.4 (B) Markov health states and transition possibilities for HIV-positive individuals (CL/HIV Co-Infection). Gray shading indicates states where both CL and CL/HIV co-infection cases could begin.

Mentions: Figure 1AFigure 1.


The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on the economic burden of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Brazil and potential value of new CL drug treatments.

Kruchten SD, Bacon KM, Lee BY - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Model structure. (A) Markov health states and transition possibilities for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative individuals (cutaneous leishmaniasis [CL] Infection) as described in Bacon and others.4 (B) Markov health states and transition possibilities for HIV-positive individuals (CL/HIV Co-Infection). Gray shading indicates states where both CL and CL/HIV co-infection cases could begin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155552&req=5

Figure 1: Model structure. (A) Markov health states and transition possibilities for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative individuals (cutaneous leishmaniasis [CL] Infection) as described in Bacon and others.4 (B) Markov health states and transition possibilities for HIV-positive individuals (CL/HIV Co-Infection). Gray shading indicates states where both CL and CL/HIV co-infection cases could begin.
Mentions: Figure 1AFigure 1.

Bottom Line: The HIV co-infection increased lifetime cost per CL case 11-371 times ($1,349-45,683) that of HIV-negative individuals ($123) and Brazil's CL burden from $1.6-16.0 million to $1.6-65.5 million.A new treatment could be a cost saving at ≤ $254 across several ranges (treatments seeking probabilities, side effect risks, cure rates) and continues to save costs up to $508 across treatment-seeking probabilities with a drug cure rate of ≥ 50%.The HIV co-infection can increase CL burden, suggesting more joint HIV and CL surveillance and control efforts are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Public Health Computational and Operations Research (PHICOR), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus