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Community health workers and stand-alone or integrated case management of malaria: a systematic literature review.

Smith Paintain L, Willey B, Kedenge S, Sharkey A, Kim J, Buj V, Webster J, Schellenberg D, Ngongo N - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: Forty-three studies were included; most (38) reported indicators of community health worker (CHW) performance, 14 reported on malaria CCM integrated with other child health interventions, 16 reported on health system capacity, and 13 reported on referral.The little evidence available on referral from community to health facility level suggests that this is an area that needs priority attention.The studies of integrated CCM suggest that additional tasks do not reduce the quality of malaria CCM provided sufficient training and supervision is maintained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disease Control Department, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, and Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Malaria Public Health Group, Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Nairobi, Kenya; United Nations Children's Fund, Health Section, Programme Division, New York, New York lucy.paintain@lshtm.ac.uk.

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Flow chart of literature search and screening. CHWs = community health workers.
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Figure 1: Flow chart of literature search and screening. CHWs = community health workers.

Mentions: A total of 3287 papers were found by searching the online publications databases. After screening, 43 papers from the published literature remained for final analysis. An additional three papers were included from the gray literature (Figure 1). The final 46 papers cover a total of 43 studies, where an individual study is defined as an evaluation of an intervention conducted in one site (country). The final 43 studies were conducted in 16 countries; 25 studies in eastern or southern Africa and 18 in western or central Africa. Most (81.4%, 35 of 43) studies were conducted in rural settings.


Community health workers and stand-alone or integrated case management of malaria: a systematic literature review.

Smith Paintain L, Willey B, Kedenge S, Sharkey A, Kim J, Buj V, Webster J, Schellenberg D, Ngongo N - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Flow chart of literature search and screening. CHWs = community health workers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4155545&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of literature search and screening. CHWs = community health workers.
Mentions: A total of 3287 papers were found by searching the online publications databases. After screening, 43 papers from the published literature remained for final analysis. An additional three papers were included from the gray literature (Figure 1). The final 46 papers cover a total of 43 studies, where an individual study is defined as an evaluation of an intervention conducted in one site (country). The final 43 studies were conducted in 16 countries; 25 studies in eastern or southern Africa and 18 in western or central Africa. Most (81.4%, 35 of 43) studies were conducted in rural settings.

Bottom Line: Forty-three studies were included; most (38) reported indicators of community health worker (CHW) performance, 14 reported on malaria CCM integrated with other child health interventions, 16 reported on health system capacity, and 13 reported on referral.The little evidence available on referral from community to health facility level suggests that this is an area that needs priority attention.The studies of integrated CCM suggest that additional tasks do not reduce the quality of malaria CCM provided sufficient training and supervision is maintained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disease Control Department, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, and Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Malaria Public Health Group, Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Nairobi, Kenya; United Nations Children's Fund, Health Section, Programme Division, New York, New York lucy.paintain@lshtm.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus