Limits...
Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

Parteli EJ, Schmidt J, Blümel C, Wirth KE, Peukert W, Pöschel T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations.Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders.Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Packing fraction as a function of the average particle size.Empty symbols show experimental results for samples a–i, each corresponding to a different particle size distribution, specified by Fig. 1 and Tab. I. Results of the simulation are shown by filled symbols: Circles: no attractive forces; diamonds: with adhesion (JKR model); squares: with both adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals interactions. The lines show the best fit to the data using Eq. (12).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151152&req=5

f3: Packing fraction as a function of the average particle size.Empty symbols show experimental results for samples a–i, each corresponding to a different particle size distribution, specified by Fig. 1 and Tab. I. Results of the simulation are shown by filled symbols: Circles: no attractive forces; diamonds: with adhesion (JKR model); squares: with both adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals interactions. The lines show the best fit to the data using Eq. (12).

Mentions: For initial conditions, we place the particles at random positions (initial space filling φ(0) ≈ 0.2) such that the particles do not touch one another (Fig. 2a). At time t = 0 the particles are released from rest and are deposited at the bottom due to gravity. The density of the sediment, φ, was computed after full relaxation, indicated by vanishing kinetic energy of the particles, via where the sum runs over all particles whose position is within the range (Hl, Hu) = (0.3, 0.7)zmax with zmax being the vertical position of the highest particle in the packing. We found that the value of φ obtained for a specific particle size distribution and inter-particle force model varies by a negligible amount over different realizations. Therefore, the values of φ presented in the following were obtained by dividing both lateral dimensions of the box in two equal parts and averaging over the 4 resulting boxes, whereas the corresponding standard deviation associated with the different simulation data is indicated by the error bars in Fig. 3.


Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

Parteli EJ, Schmidt J, Blümel C, Wirth KE, Peukert W, Pöschel T - Sci Rep (2014)

Packing fraction as a function of the average particle size.Empty symbols show experimental results for samples a–i, each corresponding to a different particle size distribution, specified by Fig. 1 and Tab. I. Results of the simulation are shown by filled symbols: Circles: no attractive forces; diamonds: with adhesion (JKR model); squares: with both adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals interactions. The lines show the best fit to the data using Eq. (12).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151152&req=5

f3: Packing fraction as a function of the average particle size.Empty symbols show experimental results for samples a–i, each corresponding to a different particle size distribution, specified by Fig. 1 and Tab. I. Results of the simulation are shown by filled symbols: Circles: no attractive forces; diamonds: with adhesion (JKR model); squares: with both adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals interactions. The lines show the best fit to the data using Eq. (12).
Mentions: For initial conditions, we place the particles at random positions (initial space filling φ(0) ≈ 0.2) such that the particles do not touch one another (Fig. 2a). At time t = 0 the particles are released from rest and are deposited at the bottom due to gravity. The density of the sediment, φ, was computed after full relaxation, indicated by vanishing kinetic energy of the particles, via where the sum runs over all particles whose position is within the range (Hl, Hu) = (0.3, 0.7)zmax with zmax being the vertical position of the highest particle in the packing. We found that the value of φ obtained for a specific particle size distribution and inter-particle force model varies by a negligible amount over different realizations. Therefore, the values of φ presented in the following were obtained by dividing both lateral dimensions of the box in two equal parts and averaging over the 4 resulting boxes, whereas the corresponding standard deviation associated with the different simulation data is indicated by the error bars in Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations.Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders.Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus