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Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

Parteli EJ, Schmidt J, Blümel C, Wirth KE, Peukert W, Pöschel T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations.Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders.Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental particle size distributions.The figure shows the volume density distributions q3 (see Eq. (1)) of the samples a–i used in the experiments. Each plot gives the volume density distribution q3(d) as a function of the particle diameter d in the sample.
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f1: Experimental particle size distributions.The figure shows the volume density distributions q3 (see Eq. (1)) of the samples a–i used in the experiments. Each plot gives the volume density distribution q3(d) as a function of the particle diameter d in the sample.

Mentions: We characterize the particle size distribution by means of q3(d) ≡ dQ3(d)/dd where Q3(d) is the fraction of mass of all particles of diameter d or smaller, relating to the probability density of particle diameters, p(d), via Figure 1 shows the size distribution, q3(d), of our experimental samples, each of them averaged over 5 independent measurements. For each sample, Tab. I provides the mean diameter, , and the obtained packing fraction, φ, again averaged over 5 independent measurements. Further, the corresponding 1%, 50%, and 99% quantiles, d1,3, d50,3, and d99,3, respectively, are given defined as , where is the inverse of Q3(d). The values from Tab. I are used furtheron for reference in the subsequent figures.


Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

Parteli EJ, Schmidt J, Blümel C, Wirth KE, Peukert W, Pöschel T - Sci Rep (2014)

Experimental particle size distributions.The figure shows the volume density distributions q3 (see Eq. (1)) of the samples a–i used in the experiments. Each plot gives the volume density distribution q3(d) as a function of the particle diameter d in the sample.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151152&req=5

f1: Experimental particle size distributions.The figure shows the volume density distributions q3 (see Eq. (1)) of the samples a–i used in the experiments. Each plot gives the volume density distribution q3(d) as a function of the particle diameter d in the sample.
Mentions: We characterize the particle size distribution by means of q3(d) ≡ dQ3(d)/dd where Q3(d) is the fraction of mass of all particles of diameter d or smaller, relating to the probability density of particle diameters, p(d), via Figure 1 shows the size distribution, q3(d), of our experimental samples, each of them averaged over 5 independent measurements. For each sample, Tab. I provides the mean diameter, , and the obtained packing fraction, φ, again averaged over 5 independent measurements. Further, the corresponding 1%, 50%, and 99% quantiles, d1,3, d50,3, and d99,3, respectively, are given defined as , where is the inverse of Q3(d). The values from Tab. I are used furtheron for reference in the subsequent figures.

Bottom Line: We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations.Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders.Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus